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Assembly simulation: interpart constraints - surface-to-surface gluingvs mesh mating with glue--

N/A
Assembly analysis
Is there a major difference between surface-to-surface gluing and mesh
mating with gluing. Tried both but didn't notice any big difference in
the results for my set up at least.
And what about all the other possabilities for interpart connection in
assembly analysis.. are there any guides or best practises, on when to
use the different contact mesh / mesh mating / Surface gluing / surface
Contact.
Thank you
Helge
2 REPLIES

Re: Assembly simulation: interpart constraints - surface-to-surface gluing vs mesh mating with glue--

N/A
Dear Helge,
Of course, I am of those that prefer to use the classical "merge coincident nodes" between parts through the Glue Coincident Mesh Mating conditions instead to let the NX NASTRAN solver to perform the "surface-to-surface" glue contact option task spending solution time and computer resources. The differences are obvious: the Glue Coincident Mesh Mating Conditions is done in the FEM file, and the Surface-to-Surface Glue contact is done in the SIM file and performed during solution of the NX Nastran run. In the second case the mesh of assembly parts could be non coincident, this allow freedom to the user to mesh independently part by part.
Glue coincident mesh mating conditions
With a Glue Coincident condition, if two faces are geometrically identical, the software merges the two faces to create a single face that is shared by the two bodies. Only the nodes on the source face remain. The nodes on the shared face and nodes on the edges of the shared face belong to the two bodies on either side. If the two faces are not geometrically identical, the common area is imprinted on either face. This forms an identical geometrical pair that the software processes further.
Update limitations
There may be some limitations to the software's ability to update the mesh mating condition following certain types of geometry modifications. For example, if you introduce a hole (or blend, chamfer, etc.) in the mated bodies that, in turn, modifies one or both mated faces. As a result, the information on the original faces that were subdivided is lost. In this case, the mesh mating condition may not update since the new subdivision creates new faces of which the existing mesh mating conditions has no knowledge.
Surface-to-Surface Gluing
The Surface-to-Surface Gluing simulation object connect two surfaces to prevent relative motion in all directions. To glue two surfaces, you must first define the regions where you want to create glue elements (stiff springs that connect and constrain the surfaces). A region is a collection of element free faces in a section of the model where you expect gluing (or contact) to occur. These regions can be created using shell elements and using free faces of solid elements. Select a source region and target region in the Simulation model. In the Surface-to-Surface Gluing dialog box, enter the parameters to define the contact between these two surfaces.
Surface-to-Surface Gluing is available for all structural NX Nastran solution sequences except for SOL 701. It is not supported in axisymmetric solutions.
If you include a Surface-to-Surface Gluing simulation object in your solution, you can use the options in the Glue Parameters dialog box to adjust NX Nastran's glue algorithm.
I hope the above to help you to understand clearly the difference between both options.
Best regards,
Blas.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Blas Molero Hidalgo
Ingeniero Industrial
Director

IBERISA
Edificio Ercilla
Rodríguez Arias 23, 3º - Dpto. 19
48011 BILBAO (SPAIN)
Tel. (+34) 94 410 65 50
Fax. (+34) 94 470 26 34
E-mail: info@iberisa.com
WEB: http://www.iberisa.com
"Helge Mjøvik" escribió en el mensaje de noticias news:4a953f06@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> Assembly analysis
>
> Is there a major difference between surface-to-surface gluing and mesh
> mating with gluing. Tried both but didn't notice any big difference in
> the results for my set up at least.
>
> And what about all the other possabilities for interpart connection in
> assembly analysis.. are there any guides or best practises, on when to
> use the different contact mesh / mesh mating / Surface gluing / surface
> Contact.
>
> Thank you
>
> Helge

Re: Assembly simulation: interpart constraints - surface-to-surfacegluing vs mesh mating with glue--

N/A
Thank you very much Blas
That was very helpful. Making a difference in needed computer resources
makes perfect sense.
Helge M
Blas Molero Hidalgo wrote:
> Dear Helge,
> Of course, I am of those that prefer to use the classical "*merge
> coincident nodes"* between parts through the *Glue Coincident Mesh
> Mating conditions* instead to let the NX NASTRAN solver to perform the
> *"surface-to-surface" glue contact* option task spending solution time
> and computer resources. The differences are obvious: the Glue Coincident
> Mesh Mating Conditions is done in the FEM file, and the
> Surface-to-Surface Glue contact is done in the SIM file and performed
> during solution of the NX Nastran run. In the second case the mesh of
> assembly parts could be non coincident, this allow freedom to the user
> to mesh independently part by part.
>
> *Glue coincident mesh mating conditions
> *With a *Glue Coincident* condition, if two faces are geometrically
> identical, the software merges the two faces to create a single face
> that is shared by the two bodies. Only the nodes on the source face
> remain. The nodes on the shared face and nodes on the edges of the
> shared face belong to the two bodies on either side. If the two faces
> are not geometrically identical, the common area is imprinted on either
> face. This forms an identical geometrical pair that the software
> processes further.
>
> *Update limitations
> *There may be some limitations to the software's ability to update the
> mesh mating condition following certain types of geometry modifications.
> For example, if you introduce a hole (or blend, chamfer, etc.) in the
> mated bodies that, in turn, modifies one or both mated faces. As a
> result, the information on the original faces that were subdivided is
> lost. In this case, the mesh mating condition may not update since the
> new subdivision creates new faces of which the existing mesh mating
> conditions has no knowledge.
>
> *Surface-to-Surface Gluing
> *The *Surface-to-Surface Gluing* simulation object connect two surfaces
> to prevent relative motion in all directions. To glue two surfaces, you
> must first define the regions where you want to create glue elements
> (stiff springs that connect and constrain the surfaces). A region is a
> collection of element free faces in a section of the model where you
> expect gluing (or contact) to occur. These regions can be created using
> shell elements and using free faces of solid elements. Select a source
> region and target region in the Simulation model. In the
> *Surface-to-Surface Gluing* dialog box, enter the parameters to define
> the contact between these two surfaces.
>
> *Surface-to-Surface Gluing* is available for all structural NX Nastran
> solution sequences except for SOL 701. It is not supported in
> axisymmetric solutions.
> If you include a *Surface-to-Surface Gluing* simulation object in your
> solution, you can use the options in the *Glue Parameters* dialog box to
> adjust NX Nastran's glue algorithm.
>
> I hope the above to help you to understand clearly the difference
> between both options.
> Best regards,
> Blas.
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Blas Molero Hidalgo
> Ingeniero Industrial
> Director
>
> IBERISA
> Edificio Ercilla
> Rodríguez Arias 23, 3º - Dpto. 19
> 48011 BILBAO (SPAIN)
> Tel. (+34) 94 410 65 50
> Fax. (+34) 94 470 26 34
> E-mail: info@iberisa.com
> WEB: http://www.iberisa.com
>
> "Helge Mjøvik" > escribió
> en el mensaje de noticias news:4a953f06@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> > Assembly analysis
> >
> > Is there a major difference between surface-to-surface gluing and mesh
> > mating with gluing. Tried both but didn't notice any big difference in
> > the results for my set up at least.
> >
> > And what about all the other possabilities for interpart connection in
> > assembly analysis.. are there any guides or best practises, on when to
> > use the different contact mesh / mesh mating / Surface gluing / surface
> > Contact.
> >
> > Thank you
> >
> > Helge