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Hydrostatic pressure in NX6


Hi,
i want to apply a hydrostatic pressure in a tank volume meshed in shell elements.
i did pick the mesh on the volum of the tank and applied the hydrosttaic pressure
from UGI, but i am bit confused about the vector direction.
does the vector direction control the depth of the tank? does it need to be default
(-Z)?
when i change the vector from -Z into -X the value of the pressure per unit area
change in PLOAD4 card.
Many thanks,

3 REPLIES

Re: Hydrostatic pressure in NX6


"engrequest" wrote:
>
>Hi,
>
> i want to apply a hydrostatic pressure in a tank volume meshed in shell elements.
>i did pick the mesh on the volum of the tank and applied the hydrosttaic pressure
>from UGI, but i am bit confused about the vector direction.
>does the vector direction control the depth of the tank? does it need to be
>default
>(-Z)?
>when i change the vector from -Z into -X the value of the pressure per unit
>area
>change in PLOAD4 card.
>
>Many thanks,
>
>

From the NX Help for the Liquid Surface block of the Hydrostatic Pressure dialog
box:
Specify Vector: Defines the direction downward from
the surface of the liquid. The default
direction is –Z.
Specify Point: Specifies the location of the surface
of the liquid. The default location
is (0,0,0).
In other words, you're simply defining a plane representing the fluid surface by
specifying a point and normal vector. The vector points "down" into the fluid.

Re: Hydrostatic pressure in NX6


Thanks Jim,
i am just wondering whether the hydrostatic pressure is the right option to model
a fluid (water) pressure inside a reservoir volume.
i need to apply a pressure into the shell elements on the reservoir surfaces.
Many Thanks,
"Jim Bernard" wrote:
>
>"engrequest" wrote:
>>
>>Hi,
>>
>> i want to apply a hydrostatic pressure in a tank volume meshed in shell

>elements.
>>i did pick the mesh on the volum of the tank and applied the hydrosttaic

>pressure
>>from UGI, but i am bit confused about the vector direction.
>>does the vector direction control the depth of the tank? does it need to

>be
>>default
>>(-Z)?
>>when i change the vector from -Z into -X the value of the pressure per unit
>>area
>>change in PLOAD4 card.
>>
>>Many thanks,
>>
>>

>
>From the NX Help for the Liquid Surface block of the Hydrostatic Pressure
>dialog
>box:
>
> Specify Vector: Defines the direction downward from
> the surface of the liquid. The default
> direction is –Z.
>
> Specify Point: Specifies the location of the surface
> of the liquid. The default location
> is (0,0,0).
>
>In other words, you're simply defining a plane representing the fluid surface
>by
>specifying a point and normal vector. The vector points "down" into the fluid.
>
>
>

Re: Hydrostatic pressure in NX6


wrote:
>
>Thanks Jim,
>
>i am just wondering whether the hydrostatic pressure is the right option to
>model
>a fluid (water) pressure inside a reservoir volume.
>i need to apply a pressure into the shell elements on the reservoir surfaces.
>
>Many Thanks,
>
>"Jim Bernard" wrote:
>>
>>"engrequest" wrote:
>>>
>>>Hi,
>>>
>>> i want to apply a hydrostatic pressure in a tank volume meshed in shell

>>elements.
>>>i did pick the mesh on the volum of the tank and applied the hydrosttaic

>>pressure
>>>from UGI, but i am bit confused about the vector direction.
>>>does the vector direction control the depth of the tank? does it need to

>>be
>>>default
>>>(-Z)?
>>>when i change the vector from -Z into -X the value of the pressure per unit
>>>area
>>>change in PLOAD4 card.
>>>
>>>Many thanks,
>>>
>>>

>>
>>From the NX Help for the Liquid Surface block of the Hydrostatic Pressure
>>dialog
>>box:
>>
>> Specify Vector: Defines the direction downward from
>> the surface of the liquid. The default
>> direction is –Z.
>>
>> Specify Point: Specifies the location of the surface
>> of the liquid. The default location
>> is (0,0,0).
>>
>>In other words, you're simply defining a plane representing the fluid surface
>>by
>>specifying a point and normal vector. The vector points "down" into the fluid.
>>
>>
>>
>
If you want the pressure to vary with the fluid depth, then hydrostatic pressure
is what you need.
Regards,
Jim