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4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

So I'm making this custom 1 off part out of aluminum but this is something I'm sure I'll run into later.

To make this in aluminum I just used multiple contour profile cuts and had the tool ramping in to the material and played with floor stock and ring height.

 

How can I rough this effectively?
I'd like to rough out the fillet effectively before sending the ball endmill in for finishing.

example_pocket-path.png

NX11.0.1
9 REPLIES

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

What blank are you starting with? billet?

Mark Rief
Retired Siemens

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

Blank would be the same part minus the grooves....

I can easily get to there with efficient tool paths... but roughing those slots is giving me trouble. I ended up messing with contour profile but I want to do a pocket routine if possible...

 

NX11.0.1

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

How about using variable streamline?

Select the floor faces without the floor radius as the milling area and use multiple passes to rough it layer by layer.

Stefan Pendl, Systemmanager CAx, HAIDLMAIR GmbH
Production: NX10.0.3, VERICUT 8.0, FBM, MRL 3.1.4 | TcUA 10.1 MP7 Patch 0 (10.1.7.0) | TcVis 10.1
Development: VB.NET, Tcl/Tk    Testing: NX11.0 EAP, NX12.0 EAP

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Accepted by topic author Dstryr
‎07-08-2016 08:41 AM

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

[ Edited ]

I would break down the roughing in two "relief" fixed axis operations and a variable axis one, like this:

ciao

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

Thank you so much for posting that file. Every day I learn a little more about multi axis toolpath configurations. The multi axis paths have so much configuration that its a little overwhelming at times. I need to get it into my head that building drive geometry seems to give cleaner paths instead of trying to use the models.

 

NX11.0.1

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

Here's another way of doing it using surface area. I also used geometry instead of the model to get clean paths. One of the corners kept giving me a criss/cross so I had to split it up from the rest.

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

I modeled this part from scratch in NX.... Which is why I dont understand the geometry issues.
It seems every time I use surface area I get the Selection tolerance error...

 

NX11.0.1

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

[ Edited ]

in this case you cannot select the pocket faces as the drive surface grid because you have 8 faces on the "higher" row and 14 faces on the "lower" one (the fillet).

Drive surface grid must be organized in rows with equal number of faces for each row.

this is not ok:

 

Uneven number of faces per rowUneven number of faces per row

Moreover the correspondent faces of each column must share their edges from start to end.

This is not ok:

Misaligned face edgesMisaligned face edges

 

 

The older versions of NX also needed a continuity of the isoparametrics although, with the recent versions, this seems not to be an issue anymore (most of the times). The faces should be "isoparametric rectangular" i.e. not trimmed with edges not corresponding to their isoparametric.

This (was?) not ok:

"Isoparametric discontinuity", faces not isoparametric rectangular"Isoparametric discontinuity", faces not isoparametric rectangular

 

The selection tolerance error can be misleading, you must verify that the drive surface grid is correctly configured before trying to edit chaining tolerance:

This should be ok:

Same number of faces, edges aligned, isoparametric continuitySame number of faces, edges aligned, isoparametric continuity

ciao

 

Re: 4/5 axis slot... how to effectively rough in harder materials?

Thank you for the explanation!

I've been learning in 5 axis work model preporation is a big factor. Dividing faces and now I see how surface area is looking.

 

Your post is much appreciated it.

-Dennis

 

NX11.0.1

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