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Saving the CAM assembly with/without machine?

Genius
Genius

Hi,

 

I was wondering how you perform saving your CAM assembly. 

 

At our company we have our own developed Save tool to save the CAM assembly to a (new) directory.

 

Assembly-wise a machine that has been used in the CAM assembly got added to the CAM assembly. From a assembly point of view everything together forms a large assembly.

 

I noticed some users also saved the machine assembly to their directory. 

 

How do you handle this?

 

Thanks in advance...

Best wishes,
Joachim

In production NX 12.0.1.7 D2
In testing NX 12.0.1.7 MP4
3 REPLIES

Re: Saving the CAM assembly with/without machine?

Siemens Legend Siemens Legend
Siemens Legend

 I usually start with a seed file that has the machine, standard tooling, fixture offsets, etc loaded, then do a File Save As. 

When you say "saved the machine assembly to their directory", are they saving the machine assemby each time; that is a lot of over head to carry. Let alone alot of edits that have to be made if the machine tool changes.

Re: Saving the CAM assembly with/without machine?

Genius
Genius

Hi Michael,

 

as I understand, you only save the root assembly.

 

Our programmers sometimes need to program a variant of an existing part. In order to do this they need to copy several files (part, blank, cam setup). The simplest way to do this is to load the original cam setup and save it to a new directory. Our application for this has a „propagate directory“ switch. In that case everything gets saved to the new directory.

The benefit is you have everything in one place. The disadvantage is you are copying the machine, too. 

 

I am thinking about changing the application to ignore the machine assembly. This is what I think I have to do.

Best wishes,
Joachim

In production NX 12.0.1.7 D2
In testing NX 12.0.1.7 MP4

Re: Saving the CAM assembly with/without machine?

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

Machine assemblies are changing with  each release, so I would never create a copy of them.

The advantage of machine assemblies is that they are always loaded as reference, so you are never working with outdated machine assemblies. There is already a mechanism that notifies you, if the kinematics have been changed due to an update, so never copy a machine assembly.

Stefan Pendl, Systemmanager CAx, HAIDLMAIR GmbH
Production: NX10.0.3, VERICUT 8.1, FBM, MRL 3.1.7 | TcUA 10.1 MP7 Patch 0 (10.1.7.0) | TcVis 11.4
Development: C (ITK), .NET, Tcl/Tk Testing: NX12.0 | AWC 3.4 Preparing: NX12.0

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