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Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Gears Legend Gears Legend
Gears Legend

Hi all,

 

How can I see whether a sketch is fully constrained yes /no. I realize that there is a function that does this, but it only shows the correct colors when I'm editing dimension or when I'm adding constrains.

But after that it's no longer visible.

So during dimensioning (editing) it can look like this (black means fully constrained):

2015-03-09_34.gif

 

And AFTER closing that dialog I don't longer see the color coding:

My Question: Is this the way it should work or not?:

2015-03-09_35.gif

 

Thanks!

Huysmans Metalen n.v.
2x NX 11.0.2.7 Mach Designer
on Win7 64bit
NX Beta Tester with focus on Sheet Metal
Command Finder is your friend
8 REPLIES

Re: Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

While in the functions for adding a dimension or a geometric constraint, the 'Status Line' should indicate the constraint status of the sketch, and if it's underconstrained, the number of additional constraints needed to fully constrain the sketch.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA

Re: Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Gears Legend Gears Legend
Gears Legend

Hi John,

 

Thanks for refreshing my memory. I actually forgot about that useful functionality.

 

Anyway I filed IR8263846 to look into this behavior. I still think that when a sketch is opened, it should show the correct color coding at all time and not only when adding dimensions or constrains.

Huysmans Metalen n.v.
2x NX 11.0.2.7 Mach Designer
on Win7 64bit
NX Beta Tester with focus on Sheet Metal
Command Finder is your friend

Re: Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Gears Honored Contributor Gears Honored Contributor
Gears Honored Contributor

This is a good use of the "auto dimensioning" feature. You always have a fully constrained sketch and if you don't like the auto dimensions, at least you have a good idea of how many constraints/dimensions you need to add.

Re: Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

I'm not sure that this is a good idea.  I think you'll find that when in any of the modes where constraints are being added, the sketch is actually attempting to update itself, hence the feedback about the constraint status.  I'm not sure that the default behavior should be that the sketch is always in a state where the solver is trying to do something as there is a certain amount of overhead involved.  Besides, one the most important and useful features of the NX sketcher is that being under or even non-constrained is perfectly valid and a behavior like you've suggested could perhaps give the impression that in order to make use of the current sketch at hand, that you must add some additional constraints, which is technically not true.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA

Re: Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Gears Legend Gears Legend
Gears Legend

What I've learned is that when using auto-dimensions the sketch per definition will always be "fully constrained". I should be aware to look at the status line to check for how many auto dimensions are still needed to get there. Only when there are no more auto-dimensions needed to get the full constraint, then the result will be fully user defined.

 

I have a past with Solid Edge (until ST2) where there was no auto dimension and then "fully constrained"  per definition meant that all dimensions and constraints were there because of wanted user input. In NX - with the use of auto-dimensoin - it is a bit different.

 

Thanks for all the answers!

Huysmans Metalen n.v.
2x NX 11.0.2.7 Mach Designer
on Win7 64bit
NX Beta Tester with focus on Sheet Metal
Command Finder is your friend

Re: Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

Please keep in mind that the use of the 'Auto Dimension' function is purely optional.  Personally, I've toggled it OFF.  The only time I use it now is when I'm stumped, like when I've got a complex sketch and I've applied all the constraints and dimensions that I think it needed but there is still some degrees of freedom, I then toggle ON the 'Continuos Auto Dimensioning' function which will then add the additional dimensions needed to fully constrain the sketch.  From these newly added 'auto dims' I can then usually find a solution that I like and then I either add my own dimensions/constraints or convert the 'auto dims' to true 'driving' dimensions.

John R. Baker, P.E. (ret)
EX-Product 'Evangelist'
Irvine, CA

Re: Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Pioneer
Pioneer

Similar to John, I have always toggled off nearly all "Auto" constraining performed within the Sketcher.  I'd much rather take the extra time to input my own dimensional and geometric constraints to ensure the design intent is exactly what I want.  I've worked this way since the Sketcher was first introduced and have genuinely appreciated how our Sketcher works compared to similar tools in other software packages.  Sure, there are times in complex sketches where I might scratch a raw spot on my head trying to get everything constrained in a proper fashion, but the combined benefits of having both degree of freedom directions displayed on unconstrained sketch points, as well as the ability to animate dimensions, make our sketcher clearly superior to others.  Personally, I use the hell out of the animate function all along the way.  It ensures the behavior of my final result is exactly consistent with the design intent I need to produce.  If you've never used it, give it a whirl.  You may be surprised at how useful it becomes.

 

Daryl Pierman
Chief CAD Designer
Rocket Shop
Aerojet Rocketdyne

Re: Sketcher: Fully constrained sketch behavior

Creator
Creator

Hello Frank

 

1. I would suggest you to have a look "below the bottom border bar" when you are in sketcher workbench which clearly says wether the sketch is constarinted fully / autoconstarints(see the attached image).

 

2. another suggetsion would be autodimesnioning