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blue temporary CSYS

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor
Very often in case of seleting vector, a blue temporary CSYS would appear. It's very good for use. But without full understanding of its meaning I never try to use it. Hope to have some information (even its name) about it.
 
Thanks!
17 REPLIES

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Phenom
Phenom

It represents the main directions (oriented as absolute WCS).

csys.png

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Solution Partner Genius Solution Partner Genius
Solution Partner Genius

Hi! @surfactant

This is used to set the direction as given in the screenshot from @Cesare.

Once you select a direction, it uses it for consequent operation. As an example, selecting the direction when creating new datum planes. This is its one and only use (vector selection).1.JPG

 

2.JPG

 

3.JPG

 

Paras Raina
Sr. Application Engineer | Solid Edge ST10 | NX 11
MSC Systems Pvt. Ltd. (India)

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

Hi @Paras_R Thanks for your reply!

 

Hi @Cesare Sorry to say that I'm a little confused by "absolute WCS". In my mind, there are "Absolute Coordinate System (ACS) " and "Work Coordinate System (WCS)". In a single part file, ACS is forever at the fixed position, and WCS can be changed.

 

Do you mean that the blue temporary CSYS simply represents the directions of "Absolute Coordinate System (ACS)" whenever it appears?

 

Thanks!

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Solution Partner Genius Solution Partner Genius
Solution Partner Genius

@surfactant

Just to make things clear, we have three types of Coordinates systems in NX:

 

1. Absolute CSYS: This is fixed and cannot be changed. This one is used in multiple commands as reference (as an example, when placing new parts, you can select absolute CSYS and then key in the coordinates. The values will be with respect to absolute 0, which is what Absolute CSYS is.

 

2. Work CSYS: This one can be changed. You can view different options related to this in Tools tab under Utilities group. It can be used to create primitives, datum planes, etc.

 

You can only have one ACSYS & WCSYS.

 

3. Datum CSYS: You can create as many of these as you want. They are visible in part navigator & probably everyone is well aware about these, so I feel I don't need to explain what exactly are they used for.

 

 

 

1.JPGNew datum CSYS with WCSYS in its original location.

 

2.JPGWCSYS moved to a new location, second Datum CSYS.I hope I helped.

Paras Raina
Sr. Application Engineer | Solid Edge ST10 | NX 11
MSC Systems Pvt. Ltd. (India)

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Solution Partner Genius Solution Partner Genius
Solution Partner Genius

Do you mean that the blue temporary CSYS simply represents the directions of "Absolute Coordinate System (ACS)" whenever it appears?

@surfactantYes, they do.

Paras Raina
Sr. Application Engineer | Solid Edge ST10 | NX 11
MSC Systems Pvt. Ltd. (India)

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Phenom
Phenom

Ciao @surfactant

 

 

"Hi @Cesare Sorry to say that I'm a little confused by "absolute WCS". In my mind, there are "Absolute Coordinate System (ACS) " and "Work Coordinate System (WCS)". In a single part file, ACS is forever at the fixed position, and WCS can be changed."

 

You are right, sorry. However I hope I did manage to help you.

 

Ciao

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

Hi @Cesare You should never say "sorry"! I've learnt so much from you. Thank you!

 

Hi @Paras_R Got it. Thanks for your explanation!

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Legend
Legend

That "blue coordinate system" is sometimes called "Orient Express." But I don't think that term ever shows up in the user interface.

 

When you need to select a vector, it is displayed near where you are working to give you a convenient way to select  one of the obvious choices for a vector direction. The orient express will be aligned with of the Work Coordinate System (WCS) directions.

 

But...

 

Selecting one of the blue axes is not associative to anything on your model. For example, if you want a pattern of features to remain parallel to a vector that already exists in your model, such as a coordinate system or a part edge, you are better off selecting the existing axis in your model, to make the selection associative. 

 

You (or a previous user) might have arbitrarily rotated the WCS, and you would be making your pattern aligned with that arbitrary direction. 

 

IMHO you are wise to avoid using it.

 

BTW- The WCS is also rarely needed anymore. To display it, the shorcut is to type the letter W on the keyboard, and again to turn it off. In older versions of NX, it was turned on by default in the template file for new parts. Now it is off by default in the template file used to create Models, but ON in the template used to create assemblies.

Re: blue temporary CSYS

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

As @MarkLawry mentioned, yes, they are called as 'Orient Express tool'. You can find 2-3 lines description here. Refer the 'Compass' section.

They are also referred as 'Inferred Vector'. 

 


Paras_R wrote:

Do you mean that the blue temporary CSYS simply represents the directions of "Absolute Coordinate System (ACS)" whenever it appears?

@surfactantYes, they do.


I don't believe so. Refer the following image, where those Inferred Vector or Orient Express Tool shows the direction similar to the orientation of WCS only, not ACS. 

orientexpress.png

 

Depending upon the command, there can be additional inferred vectors for the direction selection as shown.

Regards,
Ganesh