Cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

"Studio Surface" guidelines?

Genius
Genius
In a previous thread, @1u7obd made some very helpful comments on Studio Surface: The studio surface "will always attempt" to create an as simple and clean surface as possible.
 
With this in mind, I try my best to use Studio Surface to replace Thru Curve Mesh. But it always seems to be a little like a lucky draw.
 
In the example below, the starting curves seem to be not too bad.
 
  • Studio Surface gives a simple surface, with unacceptable kink.
  • Thru Curve Mesh gives a complex surface, with visually good smoothness.
 
Q: Are there any guidelines on refining starting curves to make Studio Surface work?
 
Thanks!
 
Image.png
 
Studio Surface
Image.png

Thru Curve Mesh
Image.png
6 REPLIES

Re: "Studio Surface" guidelines?

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

Hi,

Surely i prefer using Studio surface myself too. 

Try uing Arc Length Alignment setting ...this will give you a better studio surface


1_1_1.jpgAlso as a best practise (provided you have already checked your defining curves ) always use an isoparmetric section analysis for getting the true characteristic of the resulting surface ...if your surface curvature analysis is good then you will automatically get a nice reflection pattern.

1_1_2.jpgBest Regards

Kapil

Re: "Studio Surface" guidelines?

Genius
Genius

Hi @kapilsharma  Thanks for your solution!

 

Yes. Arc Length Alignment gets rid of the kink. But the result is very similar to that of Thru Curve Mesh.
 
Isoparametric section analysis is new to me and great!
 
Image.png

Re: "Studio Surface" guidelines?

Phenom
Phenom
@surfactant,

Studio Surface is (or at least was) part of a standalone set of tools originally called Shape Studio. One could purchase just that license and still create quality surfaces using only those tools.

I'm not going to dispute the info you quoted in your OP, but Studio Surface is completely different than TCM because you can create a surface similar to TCM but using fewer curves. If you have 2 curves that make a shape similar to an X, you can still end up with a 4 sided surface - TCM cannot do that, you'd have to use a different command like Swept, maybe. It's more of an all in one surfacing tool, rather than having 4 or 5 different ones. Plus you can control continuity no matter how many curves are input.

I hope that lends to further understanding some of the additional differences.

Most (not all) of the time, the results of your surfaces are going to lean closer to the underlying curves rather than which command you choose to use. The more you experiment, the more you will understand which command is the right tool for the job.
-Tim

Re: "Studio Surface" guidelines?

Genius
Genius

Hi @TimF  After reading your post, I would put Studio Surface at the top of all surfacing tools. Thanks!

Re: "Studio Surface" guidelines?

Phenom
Phenom
@surfactant,

It might be wise to make sure anyone else coming in behind you to work on your models is familiar and comfortable with Studio Surface. Again, it's not the answer for everything or everyone.
-Tim

Re: "Studio Surface" guidelines?

Genius
Genius

Hi @TimF   You are absolutely right. Thanks!