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3D graphic reduction and optimization

Siemens Valued Contributor Siemens Valued Contributor
Siemens Valued Contributor

When you have complex graphics coming from a CAD output the first step you might want to do is to reduce its size. Plant Simulation offers an integrated bundle of algorithms especially designed to help you with this task.

Select the new object using the right mouse key to open the context menu.

 

optimize3D_graphic.png

 

Choose “Optimize”

The dialog will present a set of tools to reduce the graphic size. You can either use only one function e.g. prune tiny graphics if your object contains plenty of small parts, or the visibility filter, that eliminates the parts that you can’t see anyway because they are hidden within the object or you can accept the result of one optimization algorithm and use the next one on top of it.

 

In the case of the tractor example the results are the following:

 

 

before   optimization

 after optimization

result   in %

Nodes

36147

1590

4.40%

Attributes

14528

3881

26.71%

Properties

54497

2974

5.46%

Polygons

15675766

7646201

48.78%

 

Using “Export Scene” > Export Graphic enables you to save the result in a new jt file. For a complex machine design the jt file size was reduced from 4GByte to 800kByte.

 

 

 

 

8 REPLIES 8

Re: 3D graphic reduction and optimization

Builder
Builder

Hi all,

 

This feature is very interesting. I have a very large .wrl (4go) of an assembly line, and i need to optimize the graphics in order to help my cpu Smiley Happy

But, testing all the parameters take a long time for a such file (about 15 to 30min for 1 test...).

 

Can you advise me some settings to reduce to the maximum? (or maybe a table with some settings related to graphics losses...)

 

Thanx in advance !

Re: 3D graphic reduction and optimization

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

There is no general "best optimization" - if there were one, you probably would already have a button that offers you to perform it.

 

However, there are some best practises:

  1. First of all: Extract what you need to extract as separate objects first. Especially if your file is that large, finding out afterwards that a needed separate sub structure is no separate structure anymore might be a bit annoying.
  2. You might want to continue with the Prune Tiny Graphics optimizer:
    Its goal is to delete graphic parts that are unimportant for simple visualization purposes because they are extremely small.
    Depending on the physical size of your graphic, set a threshold under which a graphic shall be deleted. Then apply the optimizer (Preview Result) and check the result. Almost certainly, you don't know how your graphic is structured and you might be surprised if the graphic mostly consisted of smallish graphics that then have been optimized away happily. If the result looks OK, accept the result. Otherwise revert the result and try another (smaller) setting.
  3. Next, I would use the Visibility Filter:
    This optimizer deletes graphics ans graphic parts that are not visible from the outside.
    For the best reduction, select a Cull granularity of Triangles (or Triangle Strips, depending on your version - use the entry that is the bottommost in your selection) and a Simplification level of Low (which means that the lowest graphic size results).
    Preview and check again.
    If your graphic suddenly got holey - revert, step up the cull granularity if there are lots of tiny holes or step up the simplification level if there are larger holes, and try again.
    Accept as soon as the result is OK.
  4. Finally, to reduce the structure depth of your graphic (which will be somehting your CPU benefits from), use either the Reduce Group Levels option for a careful structural reduction or Flatten Structure for the maximal reduction.
  5. Don't forget to finally accept the result (of course, only if the result is OK) before you close the dialog because closing it reverts the last changes (as in other dialogs, as well).
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Re: 3D graphic reduction and optimization

Builder
Builder

OK ! 

 

Thanks a lot for the quick response ! I'll try that. The order seems to be very important in order to have effective results.

Without this "procedure", i've tried a lot of successive optimization, with very different results...

 

Many thanks !

Re: 3D graphic reduction and optimization

Experimenter
Experimenter

Can an optimized model be exported to be used somwere else and how huge input model can be? The thing is, that instead of CAD models I have to use 3d scans. They are made with Artec Studio, which has optimisation in it, but still outputs huge files. I'd like to know if I can optimize the scans in PLM to the minimum size possibe.

Re: 3D graphic reduction and optimization

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

This is a bit difficult to answer.

 

In general, you can export graphics from Plant Simulation and so, since you can optimize them in the application, you can technically use it as an optimization tool for Jt graphics.

There are two, unfortunately somewhat fuzzy, limitations:

  1. Depending on your actual computer hardware and software configuration, the capability of software to handle utterly large files is limited. I do not exactly know what you mean with huge files - some use that term  at 10MB per file, others think that 300MB still is a normal file size. I would say that a reasonable limit for a Jt file in order to still be able to reasonably handle it is somewhere in-between. Of course, it makes a difference if we talk about one file with, say, 60MB or 20 files of that size.
    All in all, it is difficult to tell fixed numbers here.
  2. The other limitation is the Jt file acceptance of other applications. Despite there being a standard, various applications have put restrictions on the interpretation how a Jt file shall look. We continously try to create our Jt files in a way so that as many applications as possible import them and handle them meaningfully, and we still get surprised.

Long story short, I'd like to encourage you to try the optimizations in Plant Simulation but I cannot guarantee that a particular other application will work with them as expected.

 

I can put one limitation from Plant Simulation side here:

Since Plant Simulation only needs the faceted data of Jt file, we do not keep any addition data that might be stored in a Jt file - and so we cannot export them either. I your target application depends on them, this cannot work. But typically, since Jt's standard data are the faceted data, this has been rarely ever an issue.

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Re: 3D graphic reduction and optimization

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

 

Hi Peter,

 

I have a similar question.

 

Currently we get many 3d equipment files from suppliers, which are usually big (at least 300 MB, reaching a couple of GB).

 

We are trying some 3D optimization tools, and Plant Simulaion's is very eficient/simple.

 

For Plant Simulation applications, that is more than enogh. But we were wondering if it would be possible to export an optimized JT from Plant Simulation and then re-import it to Line Designer or Teamcenter?

 

I have attached a picture of the error message.

 

Many thanks.

 

Optimized JT to NX.png

Re: 3D graphic reduction and optimization

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

I you want to export a Jt from Plant Simulation to be used in CAD tools such as NX, please select the "Optimize for CAD" option in the file dialog. That way, the Jt will be built in a way that is better suited for these applications (available from version 14.0.3 onward).

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Re: 3D graphic reduction and optimization

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor
Hey Peter, that is execatly what I needed. Thank you very much!