2D Model Sheet

N/A

Can someone explain to me what the 2D model sheet is used for? I think I understand
its use for making detail views but are there other uses for the 2D model sheet?
Thanks,
Ed
11 REPLIES

Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A
The 2D model sheet is usefull for doing your 2D design/layout work. You
work 1:1, you place construction geometry, you relate geometry between
views, etc...
When done, you then place 2D Model Views of each view on the Working Sheet
or multiple Working Sheets and they can be arranged and scaled how you like,
and as you stated, you can also create Detail Views.
Alternatively, the 2D Model Sheet can be used as the "drawing" by using the
Drawing Area Setup command and placing a scaled border.
--
PellaKen
http://grundey.blogspot.com
"Ed Kadlec" wrote in message
news:47b31b9b$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>
> Can someone explain to me what the 2D model sheet is used for? I think I
> understand
> its use for making detail views but are there other uses for the 2D model
> sheet?
>
> Thanks,
> Ed


Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A

Ken,
Thank you for the explanation. I'm still a little foggy as to when you would use
the 2D Model sheet versus the working sheet. Currently I use the working sheet to
draw my parts and if there are multiple parts to the project I just add sheets and
put each part on a seperate sheet in the same drawing. Are you saying I should be
drawing my parts on the 2D Model sheet and then moving them to the working sheet?
I'm confused as to why one should do that. Sorry about the basic questions but I
am new to mechanical drawing. I've gotten very comfortable with Solid Edge 2D and
like it a lot so now I'm exploring some of the more advanced functions, at least
to me.
Ed
"Ken Grundey" wrote:
>The 2D model sheet is usefull for doing your 2D design/layout work. You
>work 1:1, you place construction geometry, you relate geometry between
>views, etc...
>
>When done, you then place 2D Model Views of each view on the Working Sheet
>
>or multiple Working Sheets and they can be arranged and scaled how you like,
>
>and as you stated, you can also create Detail Views.
>
>Alternatively, the 2D Model Sheet can be used as the "drawing" by using the
>
>Drawing Area Setup command and placing a scaled border.
>
>--
>PellaKen
>http://grundey.blogspot.com
>"Ed Kadlec" wrote in message
>news:47b31b9b$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>
>> Can someone explain to me what the 2D model sheet is used for? I think I

>
>> understand
>> its use for making detail views but are there other uses for the 2D model

>
>> sheet?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Ed

>
>

Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A
As an example consider these generalized scenarios:
You want to use B-size drawings but @ 1:1 scale each part is much larger
than 11x17. You can draw all your parts on the 2D model sheet @ 1:1 then
place drawing views on the working sheet at whatever scale is necessary to
fit. When you dimension on the working sheet the software will
automatically compensate for the drawing view scale and give you the correct
dimensions. If you want you can have the drawing view display the scale.
You can place more than 1 part detail on a single sheet if you wish.
You design a large assy on the 2D model sheet. You don't know how big it
will be when done. After the layout is complete you can place views of
various areas of the layout as needed on the working sheet. Because you
used drawing views you can quickly create detail views from any of the
drawing views.
David
"Ed Kadlec" wrote in message
news:47b33b23$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>
> Ken,
>
> Thank you for the explanation. I'm still a little foggy as to when you
> would use
> the 2D Model sheet versus the working sheet. Currently I use the working
> sheet to
> draw my parts and if there are multiple parts to the project I just add
> sheets and
> put each part on a seperate sheet in the same drawing. Are you saying I
> should be
> drawing my parts on the 2D Model sheet and then moving them to the working
> sheet?
> I'm confused as to why one should do that. Sorry about the basic questions
> but I
> am new to mechanical drawing. I've gotten very comfortable with Solid Edge
> 2D and
> like it a lot so now I'm exploring some of the more advanced functions, at
> least
> to me.
>
> Ed
>
> "Ken Grundey" wrote:
>>The 2D model sheet is usefull for doing your 2D design/layout work. You
>>work 1:1, you place construction geometry, you relate geometry between
>>views, etc...
>>
>>When done, you then place 2D Model Views of each view on the Working Sheet
>>
>>or multiple Working Sheets and they can be arranged and scaled how you
>>like,
>>
>>and as you stated, you can also create Detail Views.
>>
>>Alternatively, the 2D Model Sheet can be used as the "drawing" by using
>>the
>>
>>Drawing Area Setup command and placing a scaled border.
>>
>>--
>>PellaKen
>>http://grundey.blogspot.com
>>"Ed Kadlec" wrote in message
>>news:47b31b9b$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>>
>>> Can someone explain to me what the 2D model sheet is used for? I think I

>>
>>> understand
>>> its use for making detail views but are there other uses for the 2D
>>> model

>>
>>> sheet?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Ed

>>
>>
>

Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A
And in David's last example of the assembly, it is commonplace to need
several sheets to convey all the detail needed to document a large assembly,
of course, it horrifies me to no end to think about having to the
design/layout work in 2D Smiley Happy
--
PellaKen
http://grundey.blogspot.com
"David Rieschick" wrote in message
news:47b341b2$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> As an example consider these generalized scenarios:
>
> You want to use B-size drawings but @ 1:1 scale each part is much larger
> than 11x17. You can draw all your parts on the 2D model sheet @ 1:1 then
> place drawing views on the working sheet at whatever scale is necessary to
> fit. When you dimension on the working sheet the software will
> automatically compensate for the drawing view scale and give you the
> correct dimensions. If you want you can have the drawing view display the
> scale. You can place more than 1 part detail on a single sheet if you
> wish.
>
> You design a large assy on the 2D model sheet. You don't know how big it
> will be when done. After the layout is complete you can place views of
> various areas of the layout as needed on the working sheet. Because you
> used drawing views you can quickly create detail views from any of the
> drawing views.
>
> David
>
> "Ed Kadlec" wrote in message
> news:47b33b23$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>
>> Ken,
>>
>> Thank you for the explanation. I'm still a little foggy as to when you
>> would use
>> the 2D Model sheet versus the working sheet. Currently I use the working
>> sheet to
>> draw my parts and if there are multiple parts to the project I just add
>> sheets and
>> put each part on a seperate sheet in the same drawing. Are you saying I
>> should be
>> drawing my parts on the 2D Model sheet and then moving them to the
>> working sheet?
>> I'm confused as to why one should do that. Sorry about the basic
>> questions but I
>> am new to mechanical drawing. I've gotten very comfortable with Solid
>> Edge 2D and
>> like it a lot so now I'm exploring some of the more advanced functions,
>> at least
>> to me.
>>
>> Ed
>>
>> "Ken Grundey" wrote:
>>>The 2D model sheet is usefull for doing your 2D design/layout work. You
>>>work 1:1, you place construction geometry, you relate geometry between
>>>views, etc...
>>>
>>>When done, you then place 2D Model Views of each view on the Working
>>>Sheet
>>>
>>>or multiple Working Sheets and they can be arranged and scaled how you
>>>like,
>>>
>>>and as you stated, you can also create Detail Views.
>>>
>>>Alternatively, the 2D Model Sheet can be used as the "drawing" by using
>>>the
>>>
>>>Drawing Area Setup command and placing a scaled border.
>>>
>>>--
>>>PellaKen
>>>http://grundey.blogspot.com
>>>"Ed Kadlec" wrote in message
>>>news:47b31b9b$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>>>
>>>> Can someone explain to me what the 2D model sheet is used for? I think
>>>> I
>>>
>>>> understand
>>>> its use for making detail views but are there other uses for the 2D
>>>> model
>>>
>>>> sheet?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> Ed
>>>
>>>

>>
>
>

Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A

David,
Thanks for the example. That makes a lot of sense now. I've been chosing the sheet
size that the part would fit on at 1:1. Now I have a new tool to use.
Ed
"David Rieschick" wrote:
>As an example consider these generalized scenarios:
>
>You want to use B-size drawings but @ 1:1 scale each part is much larger
>
>than 11x17. You can draw all your parts on the 2D model sheet @ 1:1 then
>
>place drawing views on the working sheet at whatever scale is necessary to
>
>fit. When you dimension on the working sheet the software will
>automatically compensate for the drawing view scale and give you the correct
>
>dimensions. If you want you can have the drawing view display the scale.
>
>You can place more than 1 part detail on a single sheet if you wish.
>
>You design a large assy on the 2D model sheet. You don't know how big it
>
>will be when done. After the layout is complete you can place views of
>various areas of the layout as needed on the working sheet. Because you
>used drawing views you can quickly create detail views from any of the
>drawing views.
>
>David
>

Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A

Ken,
I'm learning now with your help.
When you say "it horrifies me to no end to think about having to the
design/layout work in 2D" I'm assuming you have the package with 3D and not just
Solid Edge 2D. Is that correct? Or is there another method in Solid Edge 2D that
I am not aware of?
Another question: can one draw assemblies with just the 2D package or does that
require the 3D package? I've seen drawings of assemblies that are shown exploded
or assembled and at an angle and I am wondering how that is done in 2D or if it
requires 3D. I've attached a PDF file showing what I am saying about the assembly
shown at an angle. Maybe it will be clearer than my novice explanation.
Thanks again for all your help,
Ed
"Ken Grundey" wrote:
>And in David's last example of the assembly, it is commonplace to need
>several sheets to convey all the detail needed to document a large assembly,
>
>of course, it horrifies me to no end to think about having to the
>design/layout work in 2D Smiley Happy
>
>--
>PellaKen
>http://grundey.blogspot.com

Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A
Ed,
Most likely done in 3D but of course you can draw anything you want in 2D.
At my first company we had a library of parts drawn in 2D at various
isometric orientation. We would drag in whichever orientation was needed to
create the exploded assy view.
David
"Ed Kadlec" wrote in message
news:47b350a0$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>
> Ken,
>
> I'm learning now with your help.
>
> When you say "it horrifies me to no end to think about having to the
> design/layout work in 2D" I'm assuming you have the package with 3D and
> not just
> Solid Edge 2D. Is that correct? Or is there another method in Solid Edge
> 2D that
> I am not aware of?
> Another question: can one draw assemblies with just the 2D package or does
> that
> require the 3D package? I've seen drawings of assemblies that are shown
> exploded
> or assembled and at an angle and I am wondering how that is done in 2D or
> if it
> requires 3D. I've attached a PDF file showing what I am saying about the
> assembly
> shown at an angle. Maybe it will be clearer than my novice explanation.
>
> Thanks again for all your help,
> Ed
>
> "Ken Grundey" wrote:
>>And in David's last example of the assembly, it is commonplace to need
>>several sheets to convey all the detail needed to document a large
>>assembly,
>>
>>of course, it horrifies me to no end to think about having to the
>>design/layout work in 2D Smiley Happy
>>
>>--
>>PellaKen
>>http://grundey.blogspot.com

>

Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A
Just for examples these are the types of things you can do with a drawing
view that can't be done by drawing direcly on the working sheet:
-Detail Views (magnified views) of any shape you want. Dimensions placed in
detail views will give the correct value
-Broken Views. Leave a long part at a larger scale but break the middle out
so it will fit on a sheet. Dimensions crossing the break area will still be
correct.
-Once drawing views are placed they can easily be drug around. All
dimensions an annotations associated with the view will move with it.
-Align views. For example add alignment to a front, top and side view. If
the front view is moved to the side the top view moves with it to maintain
the alignment.
David
"Ed Kadlec" wrote in message
news:47b348fa$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>
> David,
>
> Thanks for the example. That makes a lot of sense now. I've been chosing
> the sheet
> size that the part would fit on at 1:1. Now I have a new tool to use.
>
> Ed
>
> "David Rieschick" wrote:
>>As an example consider these generalized scenarios:
>>
>>You want to use B-size drawings but @ 1:1 scale each part is much larger
>>
>>than 11x17. You can draw all your parts on the 2D model sheet @ 1:1 then
>>
>>place drawing views on the working sheet at whatever scale is necessary to
>>
>>fit. When you dimension on the working sheet the software will
>>automatically compensate for the drawing view scale and give you the
>>correct
>>
>>dimensions. If you want you can have the drawing view display the scale.
>>
>>You can place more than 1 part detail on a single sheet if you wish.
>>
>>You design a large assy on the 2D model sheet. You don't know how big it
>>
>>will be when done. After the layout is complete you can place views of
>>various areas of the layout as needed on the working sheet. Because you
>>used drawing views you can quickly create detail views from any of the
>>drawing views.
>>
>>David
>>

>

Re: 2D Model Sheet

N/A

David,
So it sounds like I should be using the 2D Model sheet to create my part and then
use the working sheet to make it look pretty. It sounds like the working sheet is
mainly used to format the look of the drawing including borders and detail views,
etc. Is this correct?
Ed
"David Rieschick" wrote:
>Just for examples these are the types of things you can do with a drawing
>
>view that can't be done by drawing direcly on the working sheet:
>
>-Detail Views (magnified views) of any shape you want. Dimensions placed
>in
>detail views will give the correct value
>
>-Broken Views. Leave a long part at a larger scale but break the middle out
>
>so it will fit on a sheet. Dimensions crossing the break area will still
>be
>correct.
>
>-Once drawing views are placed they can easily be drug around. All
>dimensions an annotations associated with the view will move with it.
>
>-Align views. For example add alignment to a front, top and side view. If
>
>the front view is moved to the side the top view moves with it to maintain
>
>the alignment.
>
>David