Reply

Background Sheet

Dear fellow SE2D users,
I can't seem to find any help on this. Supposing we want to create a new
background sheet, how does one position a border from the edge of the sheet?
I mean, to a certain distance.
Best regards,
--
TH Lim
Georgetown,
Penang

6 REPLIES

Re: Background Sheet

I assume you understand that the geometry for the background is on a
background sheet.
The edge of a sheet is not locatable.
If you look at the sheet properties you will see the width and height of the
sheet.
With that in mind, you can draw a vertical line, which will be the displayed
border.
Right mouse click on on the line and select properties.
In the properties you can adjust the position of the line.
The position will be the sheet width minus the distance from the edge of the
sheet.
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: Background Sheet


Ricky, I'm seeing a lot of discussion re subject. I don't use a BG sheet. I just
use a drawing sheet and transfer the design from the Model to it. What am I missing
by not using subject? Can you briefy tell me why anyone would need a BG sheet.
Thanks
Ron

"Ricky Black" wrote:
>I assume you understand that the geometry for the background is on a
>background sheet.
>The edge of a sheet is not locatable.
>If you look at the sheet properties you will see the width and height of the
>
>sheet.
>With that in mind, you can draw a vertical line, which will be the displayed
>
>border.
>Right mouse click on on the line and select properties.
>In the properties you can adjust the position of the line.
>The position will be the sheet width minus the distance from the edge of the
>
>sheet.
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>

Ronald W Latour

Re: Background Sheet

Ronald,
There are several benefits to using a Background sheet. Some, but not all,
are listed below:
(1) BG sheet allows you to have standard "background" information and
geometry such as a title block and drawing border in a single location for
all sheets. If you have a 3 page drawing the background for all 3 would
come from the single background sheet. Edit the BG sheet and all drawing
sheets are updated.
(2) You can turn the BG sheet on and off as necessary.
(3) You can have several BG sheets in a single drawing template. For
example you can have an A, B, C and D size background and choose which one
you want to use each time you start a new drawing.
Just a little info to get you started
David

"Ronald W Latour" wrote in message
news:4c976bde$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>
> Ricky, I'm seeing a lot of discussion re subject. I don't use a BG sheet.
> I just
> use a drawing sheet and transfer the design from the Model to it. What am
> I missing
> by not using subject? Can you briefy tell me why anyone would need a BG
> sheet.
>
> Thanks
> Ron
>
>
> "Ricky Black" wrote:
>>I assume you understand that the geometry for the background is on a
>>background sheet.
>>The edge of a sheet is not locatable.
>>If you look at the sheet properties you will see the width and height of
>>the
>>
>>sheet.
>>With that in mind, you can draw a vertical line, which will be the
>>displayed
>>
>>border.
>>Right mouse click on on the line and select properties.
>>In the properties you can adjust the position of the line.
>>The position will be the sheet width minus the distance from the edge of
>>the
>>
>>sheet.
>>
>>Regards,
>>Rick B.
>>
>>

>
> Ronald W Latour
>

Re: Background Sheet

Ah Ricky,
That is a very useful tip. So, that means the lower comer of the sheet has a
co-ordinate of 0, 0. I am surprised this tip in not in the help file.
Best regards,
Lim

"Ricky Black" wrote in message
news:4c975d8d$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> I assume you understand that the geometry for the background is on a
> background sheet.
> The edge of a sheet is not locatable.
> If you look at the sheet properties you will see the width and height of
> the sheet.
> With that in mind, you can draw a vertical line, which will be the
> displayed border.
> Right mouse click on on the line and select properties.
> In the properties you can adjust the position of the line.
> The position will be the sheet width minus the distance from the edge of
> the sheet.
>
> Regards,
> Rick B.
>

Re: Background Sheet

David,
If I may point out, the main reason for using the Background Sheet is so that a standard and therefore consistent method of dimensioning and annotation can be applied on all drawing sheets.
1.. I am unfamiliar with A, B, C or D size sheets but European and Japanese drawing practice specifies minimum character heights to be applied on drawings such that if it were to be printed on smaller sheets, all dimensions and annotations would still be legible,
2.. Therefore, it is considered good draughtsmanship to apply limited sets of character heights and line weights,
3.. Preferred character heights for Engineering drawings are 2.5 mm, 3.5 mm, 5.0 mm and 7.0 mm. Architectural drawings use more,
4.. Preferred line weights or line widths are one-tenth of the above corresponding character or in computer terms, font heights. Hence, 0.25 mm, 0.35 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm,
5.. In the old days before the advent of CAD, we use technical pens of these varying line widths and they are colour coded for easy identification. I can still remember them, 0.25 mm is white, 0.35 mm is yellow, 0.5 mm is brown and 0.7 mm blue,
6.. I digress somewhat but what I am trying to say is that this standard method of drawing would be very difficult to maintain if everything is put in Model space,
7.. CAD systems dictates that we draw everything in full scale in Model space and then define the views in Paper space or Sheets. And Sheets may run more than one if there are much details to be presented,
8.. Dimensions will always come out right in Sheet space but not so when details are scaled up in Model space.
I hope I have made my point clear.
Best regards,
Lim

"David L Rieschick" wrote in message news:4c97b329$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> Ronald,
>
> There are several benefits to using a Background sheet. Some, but not all,
> are listed below:
>
> (1) BG sheet allows you to have standard "background" information and
> geometry such as a title block and drawing border in a single location for
> all sheets. If you have a 3 page drawing the background for all 3 would
> come from the single background sheet. Edit the BG sheet and all drawing
> sheets are updated.
>
> (2) You can turn the BG sheet on and off as necessary.
>
> (3) You can have several BG sheets in a single drawing template. For
> example you can have an A, B, C and D size background and choose which one
> you want to use each time you start a new drawing.
>
> Just a little info to get you started
>
> David
>
>
> "Ronald W Latour" wrote in message
> news:4c976bde$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>
>> Ricky, I'm seeing a lot of discussion re subject. I don't use a BG sheet.
>> I just
>> use a drawing sheet and transfer the design from the Model to it. What am
>> I missing
>> by not using subject? Can you briefy tell me why anyone would need a BG
>> sheet.
>>
>> Thanks
>> Ron
>>
>>
>> "Ricky Black" wrote:
>>>I assume you understand that the geometry for the background is on a
>>>background sheet.
>>>The edge of a sheet is not locatable.
>>>If you look at the sheet properties you will see the width and height of
>>>the
>>>
>>>sheet.
>>>With that in mind, you can draw a vertical line, which will be the
>>>displayed
>>>
>>>border.
>>>Right mouse click on on the line and select properties.
>>>In the properties you can adjust the position of the line.
>>>The position will be the sheet width minus the distance from the edge of
>>>the
>>>
>>>sheet.
>>>
>>>Regards,
>>>Rick B.
>>>
>>>

>>
>> Ronald W Latour
>>
>
>

Re: Background Sheet

Lim,
Yes, the sheet origin is lower left hand corner.
Regards,
Rick B.