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Bolt Hole circle


Hi
Attached is a drawing of a bolt hole circle for my mill.
Each time I want to draw a bolt hole circle of different dimensions it looks like
I have to draw another total layout in another drawing.
Is there a way to change the bolt circle and bolt hole size easily without redrawing
the entire drawing.
I've gone back to using V20
You have a great help site I really appreciate it.
Cheers
Geoff
7 REPLIES

Re: Bolt Hole circle


Geoff,
The circular pattern tool might help speed things up.
Ed
"Geoff Burford" wrote:
>
>
>
>Hi
>Attached is a drawing of a bolt hole circle for my mill.
>Each time I want to draw a bolt hole circle of different dimensions it looks
>like
>I have to draw another total layout in another drawing.
>Is there a way to change the bolt circle and bolt hole size easily without
>redrawing
>the entire drawing.
>I've gone back to using V20
>You have a great help site I really appreciate it.
>Cheers
>Geoff

Re: Bolt Hole circle

Geoff,
Looking at your drawing, you are dimensioning the position for each hole
around the bolt hole circle separately from a common origin. Is this what
you really want to do?
Typically a bolt hole circle is dimensioned to the center of the driving
circle (center of the bolt hole circle). Then each hole (circle) is placed
connected to the driving circle. The position of each hole is driven by an
angular dimension that specifies where the hole is around the driving
circle. Changing the diameter of the driving circle will reposition each
hole accordingly. Is this what you want? I can work up an example if needed.
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: Bolt Hole circle

Geoff,
Look at this example.
Start modifying the dimensions to see how it all stays tied together.
There is a single dimension to modify the diameter of all the holes. They
are all equal to eachother.
The linear dimensions will reposition the center of the bolt hole circle and
the holes adjust accordingly.
The 100mmm dimension changes the diameter of the bolt hole circle and the
holes adjust accordingly.
The 0 degree angular dimension will rotate all the holes around the bolt
hole circle.
The black 72 diameter dimension will change the angular spacing between the
holes.
If you have any questions, please ask.
Regards,
Rick B.


Re: Bolt Hole circle


Rick,
Thanks for the example. I've figured out how you did everything except the angular
dimension. Can you please explain what tool you used to measure the 72 degrees and
how you related them to each other so when you change the black one the others change
also?
Thanks,
Ed
"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Geoff,
>Look at this example.
>Start modifying the dimensions to see how it all stays tied together.
>
>There is a single dimension to modify the diameter of all the holes. They
>
>are all equal to eachother.
>The linear dimensions will reposition the center of the bolt hole circle and
>
>the holes adjust accordingly.
>The 100mmm dimension changes the diameter of the bolt hole circle and the
>
>holes adjust accordingly.
>The 0 degree angular dimension will rotate all the holes around the bolt
>hole circle.
>The black 72 diameter dimension will change the angular spacing between the
>
>holes.
>
>If you have any questions, please ask.
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>
>

Re: Bolt Hole circle

Ed,
It's very simple once you understand. A dimension can be considered a
formula. Dimension values may be driven by other dimension values. All you
have to do is to define a dimension as a formula of another dimension. Do
the following as a simple example.
Draw 2 horizontal lines, one above the other. It doesn't matter if they are
the same length.
Dimension the length of the two lines separately. Now you have two lines,
each with a length dimension.
Right mouse button click on one of the dimensions and click on Edit Formula.
In V20 you will see the edit formula ribbon bar. In V20 you can also double
left mouse click on the dimension to edit the formula.
In V100 you will see the edit formula command in command bar.
Either way, you will see a blinking cursor in the Formula field of the
dimension.
Click on the other dimension. You will see the dimension name, not the
value, in the formula field.
If you press 'Enter' on the keyboard or click on the green check to accept,
the dimension will be set equal to the other dimension. The dimension you
modified is now formula driven by the other dimension. If you change the
value of the other dimension, the modified dimension will change
accordingly. A formula driven dimension displays black with green text.
Edit the formula of the same dimension again. This time add "*2" to the end
of the name of the other dimension in the formuls field. Leave the quotes
out. Just key in * and 2.
Press Enter again. Now the formula driven dimension will be 2 times the
other dimension. When you edit the value of the other dimension, the
modified dimension will remain 2 times the value.
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: Bolt Hole circle


Rick,
Thanks for the nice explanation. I thought it might have been done using a formula
but I didn't know where to look for the formula. I haven't used the formula feature
yet but now I can see where it could be quite useful.
Ed
"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Ed,
>It's very simple once you understand. A dimension can be considered a
>formula. Dimension values may be driven by other dimension values. All you
>
>have to do is to define a dimension as a formula of another dimension. Do
>
>the following as a simple example.
>
>Draw 2 horizontal lines, one above the other. It doesn't matter if they are
>
>the same length.
>Dimension the length of the two lines separately. Now you have two lines,
>
>each with a length dimension.
>Right mouse button click on one of the dimensions and click on Edit Formula.
>In V20 you will see the edit formula ribbon bar. In V20 you can also double
>
>left mouse click on the dimension to edit the formula.
>In V100 you will see the edit formula command in command bar.
>
>Either way, you will see a blinking cursor in the Formula field of the
>dimension.
>
>Click on the other dimension. You will see the dimension name, not the
>value, in the formula field.
>If you press 'Enter' on the keyboard or click on the green check to accept,
>
>the dimension will be set equal to the other dimension. The dimension you
>
>modified is now formula driven by the other dimension. If you change the
>value of the other dimension, the modified dimension will change
>accordingly. A formula driven dimension displays black with green text.
>
>Edit the formula of the same dimension again. This time add "*2" to the end
>
>of the name of the other dimension in the formuls field. Leave the quotes
>
>out. Just key in * and 2.
>Press Enter again. Now the formula driven dimension will be 2 times the
>other dimension. When you edit the value of the other dimension, the
>modified dimension will remain 2 times the value.
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>

Re: Bolt Hole circle


Rick
I'm a bit late replying.
Many thanks for your comprehensive responses.
I understand the formula relationships a little.
I drew a bolt circle using the circular function.
I had to ungroup these to be able to use the formula function so that if the main
dimension changed, so did the others.
I notice in your example that there is only one dimension shown to control the group
diameters. Have I gone about this in the wrong way?
Also how is the PCD related to the bolt hole circle so that they are locked together
ie if the PCD is changed, so do all the bolt holes in your example?
The formula calculation assigns arbitary values ie v1019 can these be renamed to
meaningful values?
The angular function is nice as is the rotation from 0 degrees. One point I noticed
that changing the value from zero and then back to zero was that it would not accept
a zero degree value?
Relating back to an earlier question you asked re my origin points. These are used
so that all the holes are established in a positive X Y direction on my mill. No
DRO.

Regards
Geoff

"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Geoff,
>Look at this example.
>Start modifying the dimensions to see how it all stays tied together.
>
>There is a single dimension to modify the diameter of all the holes. They
>
>are all equal to eachother.
>The linear dimensions will reposition the center of the bolt hole circle and
>
>the holes adjust accordingly.
>The 100mmm dimension changes the diameter of the bolt hole circle and the
>
>holes adjust accordingly.
>The 0 degree angular dimension will rotate all the holes around the bolt
>hole circle.
>The black 72 diameter dimension will change the angular spacing between the
>
>holes.
>
>If you have any questions, please ask.
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>
>