Reply

Dim and Var


Hi there.
Say I define a variable in the Variable Table, say X, to be equal to so formula.
Then say I want to dimension a line of my drawing to have length X.
Here is what I do : I use the SmartDimension tool to create a driving dimension
for the line. Then I double click the dimension to edit its name and formula.
By default it is assigned a certian name, say v20, and I can type X in the formula
field.
But doing so, the Variable Table ends up with a X variable (var), AND a v20 dimension
(dim) defined to be equal to X.
So it's like there are 2 levels needed to dimension the line.
Of course I could name the dimension X and directly enter the formula there, But
is there a way to define a variable (X), and THEN make a dimension equal to X without
needing the v20 dimension?
(I guess my question hides another one : what's difference between var and dim...?)
Thanks,
Regards
Cedric
4 REPLIES

Re: Dim and Var

Cedric,
Dimensions are a type of variable. All dimensions will display in the
variable table. Create a new file and look at the variable table. There will
be nothing there. Place a few lines and dimension the lines. Each dimension
placed will be displayed in the variable table. You may either double click
on a dimension to edit the name and/or formula or you may do the same
directly in the variable table.
Think of a dimension as a system generated variable that drives the geometry
that it is connected to. The dimensions control the size of the model. The
dimensions give you access to driving the model from the variable table.
Formulas give you the opportunity to create your own system for driving your
design.
When you use the variable table to set the value of dimensions it makes it
easier if you rename the dimensions to give them logical names. You may also
toggle dimensions to display the name or formula graphically instead of the
value to help you visualize what you are defining in the variable table. To
do this, right mouse click on a dimension. Click on either 'Show All Names'
or 'Show All Formulas'. To change the dimension back to display the value,
click on 'Show All Values'. This changes the display of all dimensions.
The free 2D Drafting software does not have an applications interface. An
applications interface allows you to write your own external macros or
programs to create/modify just about anything. Full Solid Edge does supply
the applications interface. This applications interface gives you much more
capability than what you can ever do with the variable table. You may access
the geometry directly if needed.
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: Dim and Var


Hi Rick.
Thanks for the explanations and the hints on displaying formulas.
I'll work on it this week-end.
Best regards!
Cedric

"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Cedric,
>Dimensions are a type of variable. All dimensions will display in the
>variable table. Create a new file and look at the variable table. There will
>
>be nothing there. Place a few lines and dimension the lines. Each dimension
>
>placed will be displayed in the variable table. You may either double click
>
>on a dimension to edit the name and/or formula or you may do the same
>directly in the variable table.
>
>Think of a dimension as a system generated variable that drives the geometry
>
>that it is connected to. The dimensions control the size of the model. The
>
>dimensions give you access to driving the model from the variable table.
>Formulas give you the opportunity to create your own system for driving your
>
>design.
>
>When you use the variable table to set the value of dimensions it makes it
>
>easier if you rename the dimensions to give them logical names. You may also
>
>toggle dimensions to display the name or formula graphically instead of the
>
>value to help you visualize what you are defining in the variable table. To
>
>do this, right mouse click on a dimension. Click on either 'Show All Names'
>
>or 'Show All Formulas'. To change the dimension back to display the value,
>
>click on 'Show All Values'. This changes the display of all dimensions.
>
>The free 2D Drafting software does not have an applications interface. An
>
>applications interface allows you to write your own external macros or
>programs to create/modify just about anything. Full Solid Edge does supply
>
>the applications interface. This applications interface gives you much more
>
>capability than what you can ever do with the variable table. You may access
>
>the geometry directly if needed.
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>

Re: Dim and Var

Cedric,
Just to expand on what's been said:

>>So it's like there are 2 levels needed to dimension the line.

No. Only one level is needed to dimension a line. However, if you want to
set that dimension equal to a variable then yes, 2 levels are needed. Keep
in mind that you may want X to control more than one dimensions. Maybe Dim1
= X, Dim2 = 2*X, Dim3 = X/2 etc......

>>But is there a way to define a variable (X), and THEN make a dimension
>>equal to X without

needing the v20 dimension?
No. But as you already figured out you can rename the dimension to X

>>Dimensions are a type of variable. All dimensions will display in the
>>variable table.

This explanation can confuse new users. If you open the variable table and
click the filter button you will see that Solid Edge makes a distinction
between Dimensions & Variables. Both Dimensions and Variables can be used
in formulas but you have to be careful. Say, for example you rename a
dimension to "X". Then you use "X" in the formula of 2 other dimensions.
If for some reason the first dimension gets deleted the formula for the
other 2 dimensions will also disappear. The safest way to avoid this
problem is to create a variable in the table called "X". Then set the first
dimension = to X and the other dimensions equal to X or some formula that
includes X. That way even if the first dimension gets deleted the formulas
for the other 2 dimensions will still be intact. Of course if you delete
the variable "X" you will have the same problem. But, it is a lot harder to
accidentally delete a variable than it is to delete (or lose) a dimension.
If you plan on using a lot of formulas then I recommend you avoid linking to
many dimensions together via formulas. Instead I suggest you create
variables and set your dimensions equal to these variables. If on the other
hand you are only going to create a few simple relationships then renaming
dimensions and setting them equal to each other is the easiest way to go.
David
"Cedric Groyer" wrote in message
news:468e573b$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>
> Hi Rick.
>
> Thanks for the explanations and the hints on displaying formulas.
> I'll work on it this week-end.
>
> Best regards!
>
> Cedric
>
>
> "Ricky Black" wrote:
>>Cedric,
>>Dimensions are a type of variable. All dimensions will display in the
>>variable table. Create a new file and look at the variable table. There
>>will
>>
>>be nothing there. Place a few lines and dimension the lines. Each
>>dimension
>>
>>placed will be displayed in the variable table. You may either double
>>click
>>
>>on a dimension to edit the name and/or formula or you may do the same
>>directly in the variable table.
>>
>>Think of a dimension as a system generated variable that drives the
>>geometry
>>
>>that it is connected to. The dimensions control the size of the model. The
>>
>>dimensions give you access to driving the model from the variable table.
>>Formulas give you the opportunity to create your own system for driving
>>your
>>
>>design.
>>
>>When you use the variable table to set the value of dimensions it makes it
>>
>>easier if you rename the dimensions to give them logical names. You may
>>also
>>
>>toggle dimensions to display the name or formula graphically instead of
>>the
>>
>>value to help you visualize what you are defining in the variable table.
>>To
>>
>>do this, right mouse click on a dimension. Click on either 'Show All
>>Names'
>>
>>or 'Show All Formulas'. To change the dimension back to display the value,
>>
>>click on 'Show All Values'. This changes the display of all dimensions.
>>
>>The free 2D Drafting software does not have an applications interface. An
>>
>>applications interface allows you to write your own external macros or
>>programs to create/modify just about anything. Full Solid Edge does supply
>>
>>the applications interface. This applications interface gives you much
>>more
>>
>>capability than what you can ever do with the variable table. You may
>>access
>>
>>the geometry directly if needed.
>>
>>Regards,
>>Rick B.
>>
>>

>

Re: Dim and Var


Thanks David for the explanation.
I got your point. It's quite clear now.
So I'll keep on with my variables + dimensions.
Thank you.
Regards.
Cedric
"David Rieschick" wrote:
>Cedric,
>
>Just to expand on what's been said:
>
>>>So it's like there are 2 levels needed to dimension the line.

>
>No. Only one level is needed to dimension a line. However, if you want to
>
>set that dimension equal to a variable then yes, 2 levels are needed. Keep
>
>in mind that you may want X to control more than one dimensions. Maybe Dim1
>
>= X, Dim2 = 2*X, Dim3 = X/2 etc......
>
>>>But is there a way to define a variable (X), and THEN make a dimension
>>>equal to X without

>needing the v20 dimension?
>
>No. But as you already figured out you can rename the dimension to X
>
>>>Dimensions are a type of variable. All dimensions will display in the
>>>variable table.

>
>This explanation can confuse new users. If you open the variable table and
>
>click the filter button you will see that Solid Edge makes a distinction
>between Dimensions & Variables. Both Dimensions and Variables can be used
>
>in formulas but you have to be careful. Say, for example you rename a
>dimension to "X". Then you use "X" in the formula of 2 other dimensions.
>
>If for some reason the first dimension gets deleted the formula for the
>other 2 dimensions will also disappear. The safest way to avoid this
>problem is to create a variable in the table called "X". Then set the first
>
>dimension = to X and the other dimensions equal to X or some formula that
>
>includes X. That way even if the first dimension gets deleted the formulas
>
>for the other 2 dimensions will still be intact. Of course if you delete
>
>the variable "X" you will have the same problem. But, it is a lot harder
>to
>accidentally delete a variable than it is to delete (or lose) a dimension.
>
>If you plan on using a lot of formulas then I recommend you avoid linking
>to
>many dimensions together via formulas. Instead I suggest you create
>variables and set your dimensions equal to these variables. If on the other
>
>hand you are only going to create a few simple relationships then renaming
>
>dimensions and setting them equal to each other is the easiest way to go.
>
>David
>
>"Cedric Groyer" wrote in message
>news:468e573b$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>
>> Hi Rick.
>>
>> Thanks for the explanations and the hints on displaying formulas.
>> I'll work on it this week-end.
>>
>> Best regards!
>>
>> Cedric
>>
>>
>> "Ricky Black" wrote:
>>>Cedric,
>>>Dimensions are a type of variable. All dimensions will display in the
>>>variable table. Create a new file and look at the variable table. There

>
>>>will
>>>
>>>be nothing there. Place a few lines and dimension the lines. Each
>>>dimension
>>>
>>>placed will be displayed in the variable table. You may either double
>>>click
>>>
>>>on a dimension to edit the name and/or formula or you may do the same
>>>directly in the variable table.
>>>
>>>Think of a dimension as a system generated variable that drives the
>>>geometry
>>>
>>>that it is connected to. The dimensions control the size of the model. The
>>>
>>>dimensions give you access to driving the model from the variable table.
>>>Formulas give you the opportunity to create your own system for driving

>
>>>your
>>>
>>>design.
>>>
>>>When you use the variable table to set the value of dimensions it makes

>it
>>>
>>>easier if you rename the dimensions to give them logical names. You may

>
>>>also
>>>
>>>toggle dimensions to display the name or formula graphically instead of

>
>>>the
>>>
>>>value to help you visualize what you are defining in the variable table.

>
>>>To
>>>
>>>do this, right mouse click on a dimension. Click on either 'Show All
>>>Names'
>>>
>>>or 'Show All Formulas'. To change the dimension back to display the value,
>>>
>>>click on 'Show All Values'. This changes the display of all dimensions.
>>>
>>>The free 2D Drafting software does not have an applications interface. An
>>>
>>>applications interface allows you to write your own external macros or
>>>programs to create/modify just about anything. Full Solid Edge does supply
>>>
>>>the applications interface. This applications interface gives you much
>>>more
>>>
>>>capability than what you can ever do with the variable table. You may
>>>access
>>>
>>>the geometry directly if needed.
>>>
>>>Regards,
>>>Rick B.
>>>
>>>

>>
>
>