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Drawing Area Setup


Until today, I was unaware of the "Drawing Area Setup" in the 2D model space area.
I don't understand the use of this. I've been drawing the parts randomly in the
model space and then putting them on drawing sheets with borders and title blocks.
See the attached pictures of what I mean. What is the purpose of putting borders
on the model space area?
Thanks,
Ed
3 REPLIES

Re: Drawing Area Setup


Oops! One of the drawings didn't get attached in my original post of this message.
Here it is.
Ed
"Ed Kadlec" wrote:
>
>
>
>Until today, I was unaware of the "Drawing Area Setup" in the 2D model space
>area.
>I don't understand the use of this. I've been drawing the parts randomly in
>the
>model space and then putting them on drawing sheets with borders and title
>blocks.
>See the attached pictures of what I mean. What is the purpose of putting borders
>on the model space area?
>
>Thanks,
>Ed

Re: Drawing Area Setup

Ed,
The use of Drawing Area Setup in 2D Model is a matter of preference. What
you are doing with the working sheet and 2D Model views is perfectly OK.
Others prefer to work in a single context. they want to work only in 2D
Model. This is where Drawing Area Setup is handy. Drawing Area Setup helps
you out with respect to scale. Typically your geometry you create in 2D
Model needs to be at 1 to 1 scale. This is so that you can easily translate
the file and send the geometry to other software packages for manufacturing.
The problems with working at 1 to 1 scale really has to do with sheet
borders and text and not so much with the geometry geometry. For example if
you are drawing geometry that fits on a standard sheet size, you will not
see a problem. Dimension text can be seen easily and printed easily relative
to the paper size.
But, maybe you want to draw your house floor plan. You also want to plot
(print) it out on an A Size (8.5 X 11) sheet. The geometry of your floor
plan is much larger than an A Size drawing. When you create the geometry and
place dimensions, the dimension text will be sized relative to paper. So
when you fit to view the floor plan, the text size of the dimensions cannot
be read. this is because the text size will be something like .125 in. for
ANSI drawings. Also when you print area the text size cannot be read on
paper.
The Drawing Area Setup will ask you to input information about the overall
size of the geometry you want to create. It will also ask you to input the
size of paper you want to plot to. Based on the information you give, it
will calculate the scale needed to place a skeet border block around the
geometry. It will also use this scale and apply it to the text size of all
objects (dimension, balloon, callout, text box) that display text. You will
see the scale on the ribbon bar for these objects when you place them. This
way when you draw the geometry at 1 to 1 scale and dimension it, you can see
the dimensions. When you plot (print), use print area. Use the indicators in
the corners of the sheet border block to specify the size of the area. The
text on the drawing will be the correct size relative to the paper size
printed to.
You can create multiple sets of geometry of different sizes and place
multiple borders around the different geometries all in 2D Model. All you
need to do is to note the scale needed for each geometry set and set the
text scale to that value when moving between the sets.
I hope this helps explain the use of Drawing Area Setup.
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: Drawing Area Setup


Rick,
Thanks for the explanation. It makes perfect sense now and I can see where there
is a use for it. For the drawings I've done so far, I end up scaling them when I
place them on the drawing sheet and it has worked out for me. I can see where larger
drawings such as a house floor plan like you suggested would need to be done differently
though.
Thanks,
Ed
"Rick B." wrote:
>Ed,
>The use of Drawing Area Setup in 2D Model is a matter of preference. What
>
>you are doing with the working sheet and 2D Model views is perfectly OK.
>
>Others prefer to work in a single context. they want to work only in 2D
>Model. This is where Drawing Area Setup is handy. Drawing Area Setup helps
>
>you out with respect to scale. Typically your geometry you create in 2D
>Model needs to be at 1 to 1 scale. This is so that you can easily translate
>
>the file and send the geometry to other software packages for manufacturing.
>
>The problems with working at 1 to 1 scale really has to do with sheet
>borders and text and not so much with the geometry geometry. For example if
>
>you are drawing geometry that fits on a standard sheet size, you will not
>
>see a problem. Dimension text can be seen easily and printed easily relative
>
>to the paper size.
>
>But, maybe you want to draw your house floor plan. You also want to plot
>(print) it out on an A Size (8.5 X 11) sheet. The geometry of your floor
>plan is much larger than an A Size drawing. When you create the geometry and
>
>place dimensions, the dimension text will be sized relative to paper. So
>when you fit to view the floor plan, the text size of the dimensions cannot
>
>be read. this is because the text size will be something like .125 in. for
>
>ANSI drawings. Also when you print area the text size cannot be read on
>paper.
>
>The Drawing Area Setup will ask you to input information about the overall
>
>size of the geometry you want to create. It will also ask you to input the
>
>size of paper you want to plot to. Based on the information you give, it
>will calculate the scale needed to place a skeet border block around the
>geometry. It will also use this scale and apply it to the text size of all
>
>objects (dimension, balloon, callout, text box) that display text. You will
>
>see the scale on the ribbon bar for these objects when you place them. This
>
>way when you draw the geometry at 1 to 1 scale and dimension it, you can see
>
>the dimensions. When you plot (print), use print area. Use the indicators
>in
>the corners of the sheet border block to specify the size of the area. The
>
>text on the drawing will be the correct size relative to the paper size
>printed to.
>
>You can create multiple sets of geometry of different sizes and place
>multiple borders around the different geometries all in 2D Model. All you
>
>need to do is to note the scale needed for each geometry set and set the
>text scale to that value when moving between the sets.
>
>I hope this helps explain the use of Drawing Area Setup.
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>