Reply

FORMULA SYNTAX


Ricky, I'm in the process of following thru on our thread re OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED
DISTANCE.
I'm trying to enter a formula in a dimension that will set a minimum distance of
1/8" using the GREATER THAN OR EQUAL TO symbology in the Help USING VARIABLES section.
After context menu EDIT FORMULA, I entered in the formula box:[1/8 and got a syntax
error.
So I changed it to GREATER THAN OR EQUAL TO 1/8" & LESS THAN 3/16" using the exact
syntax in the Help section i.e., [1/8;3/16) and got another error message "Syntax
error in formula missing parenthesis". Obviously, I'm missing something but what?
Thanks,
Ron
Ronald W Latour
4 REPLIES

Re: FORMULA SYNTAX

Ron,
First, I have attached an example that does not require a dimension to drive
the offset in the top view. I added a connect constraint between the end of
the chamfer line in the front view and the vertical line of the offet in the
top view. I deleted the dimension that drives the offset and now let the
constraint control the offset. Now the chamfer dimension controlls the
offset in the top view without a formula driven dimension.
What you are trying to accomplish is to set limits on the variable. All
dimensions are variables. Go to variable table, click the Variables button
on the tools tab. Look at V3434 which is your 1" dimension. Look at the
range column. I have defined a range from 1" to 1 1/2".
Regards,
Rick B.


Re: FORMULA SYNTAX


Ricky, I'm attaching a sample file. I thought I understood limits on dimensions
but maybe not. In the example, I have a simple rectangle with dimensions shown.
I've placed limits on two of the subdimensions. I want to be able to change the
overall height dimension to change the height of the rectangle without exceeding
these limits. But when I do it, I just get an unlined dimension for the overall
height. NOthing changes. It seems like I shoud be able to increase the height
to almost any thing I want but not reduce the height below the limits.
Thanks,
Ron

"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Ron,
>First, I have attached an example that does not require a dimension to drive
>
>the offset in the top view. I added a connect constraint between the end of
>
>the chamfer line in the front view and the vertical line of the offet in the
>
>top view. I deleted the dimension that drives the offset and now let the
>constraint control the offset. Now the chamfer dimension controlls the
>offset in the top view without a formula driven dimension.
>
>What you are trying to accomplish is to set limits on the variable. All
>dimensions are variables. Go to variable table, click the Variables button
>
>on the tools tab. Look at V3434 which is your 1" dimension. Look at the
>range column. I have defined a range from 1" to 1 1/2".
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>
>

Ronald W Latour

Re: FORMULA SYNTAX

Ron,
If you notice the overall height dimension, it is a different color than the
other dimensions. This is because the combination of the three smaller
dimensions define the overall height. If you change these dimensions, the
height changes. The large dimension is placed as a driven or unlocked
dimension. Changing the smaller dimensions will change this dimension. This
dimension cannot control the height because the height is already defined by
the other dimensions. To do this would cause an overconstrained condition
and is not allowed. If you click on the text of each dimension, you will see
a lock button. Locked is driving. Unlocked is driven.
A simple example is to place line. Place two dimension on the line. The
first drives the length of the line. The second cannot and is driven by the
first.
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: FORMULA SYNTAX


Ricky, I understand. Again, I need to change the way I think.
Thanks,
Ron
"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Ron,
>If you notice the overall height dimension, it is a different color than the
>
>other dimensions. This is because the combination of the three smaller
>dimensions define the overall height. If you change these dimensions, the
>
>height changes. The large dimension is placed as a driven or unlocked
>dimension. Changing the smaller dimensions will change this dimension. This
>
>dimension cannot control the height because the height is already defined
>by
>the other dimensions. To do this would cause an overconstrained condition
>
>and is not allowed. If you click on the text of each dimension, you will see
>
>a lock button. Locked is driving. Unlocked is driven.
>
>A simple example is to place line. Place two dimension on the line. The
>first drives the length of the line. The second cannot and is driven by the
>
>first.
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>

Ronald W Latour