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Maintaining block orientation after rotate command

Hi Guys

If I place an annotation in the model with a text angle of, let's say 0 deg, then I rotate the model, the annotation rotates with the model but it remains aligned to the zero deg text angle.

If would like some of my blocks to behave the same way, ie rotate with the model but retain their original orientation.

 

I have tried many different types of relationships but the rotate command always takes precedent.

 

Ant ideas would be appreciated.

Cheers

Pete

 

6 REPLIES

Re: Maintaining block orientation after rotate command

Pete, I’m not sure what you mean by “rotate with the model but retain their original orientation”. When I place any annotation in a BLOCK and rotate the BLOCK, the annotation rotates with the geometry and maintains it same relative position. If you mean that you want the annotation to always be in the conventional “upright” position regardless of geometry orientation, I don’t know of a way.

 

Ron

 

Re: Maintaining block orientation after rotate command

Hi Ron

Perhaps I did not explain myself very clearly.

If you draw a rectangle and place an annotation inside it and set the text angle to zero,then rotate the whole lot, everything rotates including the text but its orientation (or text angle) remains zero. 

I would like some of my blocks to behave like an annotation which has a text angle of zero by setting some sort of relationship. 

 

Cheers

Pete

Re: Maintaining block orientation after rotate command

Pete, I’ve created a screen capture video at the website below of what I think you are describing. There are 3 rectangles, each w/ a CALLOUT annotation imbedded w/ a the text angle to “0”. I’ve made one rectangle a BLOCK, one’s a GROUP, & the other is ungrouped. I’ve rotated each to show you what will when I do it. But unlike what I think you’ve experienced, the CALLOUT in all but the BLOCK, doesn’t rotate and maintains a text angle of “0”. Only the one in the BLOCK rotates. But, of course, when you open the BLOCK to check the text angle; the BLOCK opens in the orientation in which it was created. So I’m confused and maybe someone with more SE experience needs to tackle this one. Or make a video of what you are doing and maybe I’ll get a better idea. http://screencast.com/t/EobFakAIp Sorry, Ron

Re: Maintaining block orientation after rotate command

Hi Ron

I sometimes get a floor plan of a building in .dwg format which I import and use to then create fire detection plans, so I have blocks I add to show detectors, fire panels etc. If I am dumb and get to the layout stage and realise the drawings do not look very professional I may decide to rotate the floor plan to a more asthetically pleasing angle. Of course all my annotations remain at the correct angle, but I have to then go and rotate all my blocks one by one. Of course its my own lack of vision which causes this problem, but a quick way out would be nice.

I have attached a .dft which may help explain. The rectangle represents the floor plan, and the block represents a fire detection symbol of some sort. The first view would be my original drawing. The second shows what happens after I rotate the lot, and the final shows how I would like it to appear.

 

Cheers

Pete

Re: Maintaining block orientation after rotate command

Pete, I’ve played around with your layout. The only way I know of doing it is to use some form of balloon annotation fixed to a part of the floorplan. Don’t make the annotation a block. This would require you to change your symbols to use the balloon with something inside, e.g., an alpha/numberic combination to indicate the various detectors, fire panels, etc.

 

See the altered file attachment.

 

This is probably not much help but all I can come up with. Maybe Ricky can give you some guidance.

 

Ron

 

Re: Maintaining block orientation after rotate command

Hi Ron

Thanks for the suggestion.

The blocks which represent the various components of a fire detection system have to comply with australian standards, so they all look the same irrespective of which company produces the drawings. This means I can't make my own design just as a work around.

Oh well, looks like I will just have to plan my work a little better.

Remember when we used drawing boards, set squares, ink pens and little erasers mounted on the ends of little electric motors. We had to think about the distance between views and the placement of all the dimensions before we even drew the first line. I am spoilt now Smiley Happy

 

Cheers

Pete