Reply

OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED DISTANCE


Let's start with a rectangle and say it's rectangle A. There is point, B, within
this rectangle at the intersection of 2 lines unassociated with A. I don't know
the exact distance from B to any given leg of A. But I want to draw another rectangle,
C, inside of A with all sides parallel and equi-distance from A. The distance between
A and C is established by the location of point B. I first tried OFFSET COMMAND.
But it requires an exact distance to be inputted. Than I tried SCALE COMMAND without
sucess.
How is the easiest way to do this? I do this all the time when I'm projecting an
orthographic front view to create a top view. Other CAD programs allowed me to
just click where I wanted the offset distance to be without having to worry about
knowing the actual offset distance.
Thanks,
Ron
Ronald W Latour
7 REPLIES

Re: OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED DISTANCE


"Ronald W Latour" wrote in message
news:4a204f78$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>
> Let's start with a rectangle and say it's rectangle A. There is point, B,
> within
> this rectangle at the intersection of 2 lines unassociated with A. I
> don't know
> the exact distance from B to any given leg of A. But I want to draw
> another rectangle,
> C, inside of A with all sides parallel and equi-distance from A. The
> distance between
> A and C is established by the location of point B. I first tried OFFSET
> COMMAND.
> But it requires an exact distance to be inputted. Than I tried SCALE
> COMMAND without
> sucess.
>
> How is the easiest way to do this? I do this all the time when I'm
> projecting an
> orthographic front view to create a top view. Other CAD programs allowed
> me to
> just click where I wanted the offset distance to be without having to
> worry about
> knowing the actual offset distance.
>
> Thanks,
> Ron
> Ronald W Latour


Re: OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED DISTANCE

Ron,
The Offset command is an associative offset. You can go back and edit the
ofset after it is places. This is why the distance is a key in. I don't
understand what offset has to do with orthogonal projection. Can you send an
example of what you are trying to do?
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED DISTANCE


Ricky, I attached a file showing a front view of a simple box with the width and
lenght known. It has a chamfered top edge of unknown but equal dimension all around
the top edge.
Object: Draw a top view showing the chamfered edge using the Offset command without
having to draw a side view. Why offset? Because in other CAD sofware, that's what
I would've used and it was very simple.
I could use individual lines to do this or I could draw a rectangle inside connecting
the points at the projection line intersections.
But I would've thought that this should be a natural for that command. If so, how?
Ron

"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Ron,
>The Offset command is an associative offset. You can go back and edit the
>
>ofset after it is places. This is why the distance is a key in. I don't
>understand what offset has to do with orthogonal projection. Can you send
>an
>example of what you are trying to do?
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>

Ronald W Latour

Re: OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED DISTANCE

Ron,
First of all you have relationships turned off and you are still thinking
like an AutoCAD user.
Look at the modified file. Change the dimension (1") that controlls the
setback on the chamfer.
I created a formula for the dimension that controlls the offset on the top
view to be equal to the
1" chamfer dimension. As you change the chamfer in the front view, the
offset profile in the top view changes accordingly.
Regards,
Rick B.


Re: OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED DISTANCE


Ricky, I checked out the example file. Yes that works neat. And yes I had the relationship
off. However, I failed to cleary explain what I was trying to do. First, I shouldn't
have shown 3 points because that is not how I was trying to draw the offset. I
forgot and left the extra points because I had to resort to drawing rectangle.
Anyway, what I wanted to accomplish is to draw an offset in the top view with only
one point as a given. And that point is an edge projected from the front view intersecting
with a 45deg construction line in the top view. Further, the edge created by the
chamfer (which you controlled with a formula) in the front view is not a dimensioned
element in my real design. In my real world, that edge falls at a place that is
esthetically pleasing to me when I'm designing the profile of a jewelry box. It
is where it is.
However, I've found a way that is not quite as easy but acceptable considering all
the other advantages that SE provides. It just requires me to identify 2 points
in the top view and than draw a rectangle. Not a big deal. I just was hoping that
I might've missed an easier way.
I'm probably not using SE quite the way it was designed to be used. I'm a woodworker
who makes one of a kind jewelry/music/etc. boxes. No two are alike. So establishing
relationships/driving dimensions in many cases is not worth the time. Another reason
is the all the dimensions result is alot of clutter. I know that I can put the dimensions
on a different layer and turn it off. But that requires that I remember to do that
each time a dimension appears. Have you all considered allowing the user to assign
certain elements (e.g., dimensions, text, etc.) to a predetermined layer(s)?

Thanks,
Ron

"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Ron,
>First of all you have relationships turned off and you are still thinking
>
>like an AutoCAD user.
>
>Look at the modified file. Change the dimension (1") that controlls the
>setback on the chamfer.
>I created a formula for the dimension that controlls the offset on the top
>
>view to be equal to the
>1" chamfer dimension. As you change the chamfer in the front view, the
>offset profile in the top view changes accordingly.
>
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>
>

Ronald W Latour

Re: OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED DISTANCE

Ron,
I'll answer your last question first.
Yes, we are considering a system where users can predefine the layers
objects are placed on. Currently this has lower priority.
I understand that you are working with esthetics in your designs, but I urge
you to use the constraint system. Even for esthetics, the driving dimensions
can help you manipulate the geometry to achieve the esthetic look you want
easier than trying to drag modify the geometry. Also it ties the two views
together so that you do not have to manually modify both.
I can work with constrained geometry much faster and easier than with simple
geometry alone.
I'm just offering some suggestions.
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: OFFSETTING TO AN UNSPECIFIED DISTANCE


Ricky, when I read your last note, it suddenly dawned on me that the offset dimension
in the top view based on the edge of the chamfer in the front view doesn't have
to be known. It doesn't matter what it is so long as I set the offset dimension
equal to the chamfer dimension letting the chamfer dim drive. I kept looking at
your example as if I had to know what the chamfer dimension is. Thanks for breaking
my paradiem. I will redraw my box profile keeping this in mind and see what happens.
Ron

"Ricky Black" wrote:
>Ron,
>I'll answer your last question first.
>Yes, we are considering a system where users can predefine the layers
>objects are placed on. Currently this has lower priority.
>
>I understand that you are working with esthetics in your designs, but I urge
>
>you to use the constraint system. Even for esthetics, the driving dimensions
>
>can help you manipulate the geometry to achieve the esthetic look you want
>
>easier than trying to drag modify the geometry. Also it ties the two views
>
>together so that you do not have to manually modify both.
>
>I can work with constrained geometry much faster and easier than with simple
>
>geometry alone.
>
>I'm just offering some suggestions.
>Regards,
>Rick B.
>
>

Ronald W Latour