Reply

Threads

I am doing a simple drawing and want to show 'threads' ( us cut on a lathe)
Help is no help.
Thanks,
--

david.



10 REPLIES

Re: Threads

David,
Threads is an interesting subject. It's a good idea to know what you really
need to depict before you get into it. Most people these days depict threads
using the simplified method -- for ANSI this is just a few dashed lines and
an annotation. Its quick and easy and that's why this is the preferred
method. It's also possible to depict detailed threads but most people don't
find it worth the trouble. Is there a particular reason you need to detail
the threads in this case?
I've enclosed a shot with a few different alternatives. The one on the right
is the ANSI depiction. The one on the left is the "old school" detailed
depiction. If you want the one on the left, technically the thread is a
bspline curve (side view of a helix) -- you'd find this command on the
pullout under the line command. But unless you have a very long pitch,
angled lines will approximate this well enough for most applications (and
certainly what the old school drafters did). FYI, the top picture enclosed
is the 3D way to do this (not possible in the free product) -- one end is
done old school using a helix and a "cut feature" to create completely
accurate thread geometry (you might do this if you molding the threads for
bottle maybe) -- the other end just has an attribute that says "threaded" --
the system automatically puts a texture map on that face to make it look
threaded and then it does the ANSI depiction in the drawing.
Probably MORE than you ever wanted to know!
Good luck!
DS

"David" wrote in message
news:4525743f$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>I am doing a simple drawing and want to show 'threads' ( us cut on a lathe)
> Help is no help.
> Thanks,
>
> --
>
>
> david.
>
>
>
>
>
>



Re: Threads

Thanks for replying.
I just want to make some zig zags and can not find out how to do it neatly
and not freehand.

"Dan Staples" wrote in message
news:45258866@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> David,
>
> Threads is an interesting subject. It's a good idea to know what you
> really need to depict before you get into it. Most people these days
> depict threads using the simplified method -- for ANSI this is just a few
> dashed lines and an annotation. Its quick and easy and that's why this is
> the preferred method. It's also possible to depict detailed threads but
> most people don't find it worth the trouble. Is there a particular reason
> you need to detail the threads in this case?
>
> I've enclosed a shot with a few different alternatives. The one on the
> right is the ANSI depiction. The one on the left is the "old school"
> detailed depiction. If you want the one on the left, technically the
> thread is a bspline curve (side view of a helix) -- you'd find this
> command on the pullout under the line command. But unless you have a very
> long pitch, angled lines will approximate this well enough for most
> applications (and certainly what the old school drafters did). FYI, the
> top picture enclosed is the 3D way to do this (not possible in the free
> product) -- one end is done old school using a helix and a "cut feature"
> to create completely accurate thread geometry (you might do this if you
> molding the threads for bottle maybe) -- the other end just has an
> attribute that says "threaded" -- the system automatically puts a texture
> map on that face to make it look threaded and then it does the ANSI
> depiction in the drawing.
>
> Probably MORE than you ever wanted to know!
>
> Good luck!
>
> DS
>
>
> "David" wrote in message
> news:4525743f$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>I am doing a simple drawing and want to show 'threads' ( us cut on a
>>lathe)
>> Help is no help.
>> Thanks,
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>> david.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>

>
>
>

Re: Threads

David,
Have you tried either using pattern or creating a custom hatch pattern?

"David" wrote in message
news:45259349@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> Thanks for replying.
> I just want to make some zig zags and can not find out how to do it neatly
> and not freehand.
>
>
>
> "Dan Staples" wrote in message
> news:45258866@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>> David,
>>
>> Threads is an interesting subject. It's a good idea to know what you
>> really need to depict before you get into it. Most people these days
>> depict threads using the simplified method -- for ANSI this is just a few
>> dashed lines and an annotation. Its quick and easy and that's why this is
>> the preferred method. It's also possible to depict detailed threads but
>> most people don't find it worth the trouble. Is there a particular reason
>> you need to detail the threads in this case?
>>
>> I've enclosed a shot with a few different alternatives. The one on the
>> right is the ANSI depiction. The one on the left is the "old school"
>> detailed depiction. If you want the one on the left, technically the
>> thread is a bspline curve (side view of a helix) -- you'd find this
>> command on the pullout under the line command. But unless you have a very
>> long pitch, angled lines will approximate this well enough for most
>> applications (and certainly what the old school drafters did). FYI, the
>> top picture enclosed is the 3D way to do this (not possible in the free
>> product) -- one end is done old school using a helix and a "cut feature"
>> to create completely accurate thread geometry (you might do this if you
>> molding the threads for bottle maybe) -- the other end just has an
>> attribute that says "threaded" -- the system automatically puts a
>> texture map on that face to make it look threaded and then it does the
>> ANSI depiction in the drawing.
>>
>> Probably MORE than you ever wanted to know!
>>
>> Good luck!
>>
>> DS
>>
>>
>> "David" wrote in message
>> news:4525743f$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>>I am doing a simple drawing and want to show 'threads' ( us cut on a
>>>lathe)
>>> Help is no help.
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>>
>>> david.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>
>

Re: Threads

Aha, here's how -- you just need to create a single thread and "pattern" it.
There are rectangular and circular patterns. In this case, you need
retangular with a Y count of 1 and an X count of number of threads. Proceed
as follows:
1. Draw one thread (however you choose to make one single thread look)
2. About midway down the draw toolbar is a Rectangular Pattern -- it will be
disabled so its easy to find. don't select it yet, just find it.
3. Select your thread geometry with the Select Arrow (first icon on the
toolbar) (drag to get with a fence or ctrl click to pick multiple things)
4. Notice that the Rect Patt command enables -- Select it.
5. Key in the values you need in the "Ribbon Bar" at the top of the screen
and hit Finish.
Voila!
DS

"David" wrote in message
news:45259349@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> Thanks for replying.
> I just want to make some zig zags and can not find out how to do it neatly
> and not freehand.
>
>
>
> "Dan Staples" wrote in message
> news:45258866@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>> David,
>>
>> Threads is an interesting subject. It's a good idea to know what you
>> really need to depict before you get into it. Most people these days
>> depict threads using the simplified method -- for ANSI this is just a few
>> dashed lines and an annotation. Its quick and easy and that's why this is
>> the preferred method. It's also possible to depict detailed threads but
>> most people don't find it worth the trouble. Is there a particular reason
>> you need to detail the threads in this case?
>>
>> I've enclosed a shot with a few different alternatives. The one on the
>> right is the ANSI depiction. The one on the left is the "old school"
>> detailed depiction. If you want the one on the left, technically the
>> thread is a bspline curve (side view of a helix) -- you'd find this
>> command on the pullout under the line command. But unless you have a very
>> long pitch, angled lines will approximate this well enough for most
>> applications (and certainly what the old school drafters did). FYI, the
>> top picture enclosed is the 3D way to do this (not possible in the free
>> product) -- one end is done old school using a helix and a "cut feature"
>> to create completely accurate thread geometry (you might do this if you
>> molding the threads for bottle maybe) -- the other end just has an
>> attribute that says "threaded" -- the system automatically puts a
>> texture map on that face to make it look threaded and then it does the
>> ANSI depiction in the drawing.
>>
>> Probably MORE than you ever wanted to know!
>>
>> Good luck!
>>
>> DS
>>
>>
>> "David" wrote in message
>> news:4525743f$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>>I am doing a simple drawing and want to show 'threads' ( us cut on a
>>>lathe)
>>> Help is no help.
>>> Thanks,
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>>
>>> david.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>
>

Re: Threads

Thank you very much. I will give all your suggestions a try.
I am very much a Noob on this and will go slow and learn.
david
"Dan Staples" wrote in message
news:452652f2$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
> Aha, here's how -- you just need to create a single thread and "pattern"
> it. There are rectangular and circular patterns. In this case, you need
> retangular with a Y count of 1 and an X count of number of threads.
> Proceed as follows:
>
> 1. Draw one thread (however you choose to make one single thread look)
> 2. About midway down the draw toolbar is a Rectangular Pattern -- it will
> be disabled so its easy to find. don't select it yet, just find it.
> 3. Select your thread geometry with the Select Arrow (first icon on the
> toolbar) (drag to get with a fence or ctrl click to pick multiple things)
> 4. Notice that the Rect Patt command enables -- Select it.
> 5. Key in the values you need in the "Ribbon Bar" at the top of the screen
> and hit Finish.
>
> Voila!
>
> DS
>
>
> "David" wrote in message
> news:45259349@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>> Thanks for replying.
>> I just want to make some zig zags and can not find out how to do it
>> neatly and not freehand.
>>
>>
>>
>> "Dan Staples" wrote in message
>> news:45258866@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>> David,
>>>
>>> Threads is an interesting subject. It's a good idea to know what you
>>> really need to depict before you get into it. Most people these days
>>> depict threads using the simplified method -- for ANSI this is just a
>>> few dashed lines and an annotation. Its quick and easy and that's why
>>> this is the preferred method. It's also possible to depict detailed
>>> threads but most people don't find it worth the trouble. Is there a
>>> particular reason you need to detail the threads in this case?
>>>
>>> I've enclosed a shot with a few different alternatives. The one on the
>>> right is the ANSI depiction. The one on the left is the "old school"
>>> detailed depiction. If you want the one on the left, technically the
>>> thread is a bspline curve (side view of a helix) -- you'd find this
>>> command on the pullout under the line command. But unless you have a
>>> very long pitch, angled lines will approximate this well enough for most
>>> applications (and certainly what the old school drafters did). FYI, the
>>> top picture enclosed is the 3D way to do this (not possible in the free
>>> product) -- one end is done old school using a helix and a "cut
>>> feature" to create completely accurate thread geometry (you might do
>>> this if you molding the threads for bottle maybe) -- the other end just
>>> has an attribute that says "threaded" -- the system automatically puts
>>> a texture map on that face to make it look threaded and then it does the
>>> ANSI depiction in the drawing.
>>>
>>> Probably MORE than you ever wanted to know!
>>>
>>> Good luck!
>>>
>>> DS
>>>
>>>
>>> "David" wrote in message
>>> news:4525743f$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>>>I am doing a simple drawing and want to show 'threads' ( us cut on a
>>>>lathe)
>>>> Help is no help.
>>>> Thanks,
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> david.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>

>>
>>
>
>

Re: Threads

Revisiting this..

I'd like to create a hatch pattern representing threads as alternating full-width lines and lines gapped at each end. Something like

+---------+
| -------- |
+---------+
| -------- |
+---------+
| -------- |
+---------+

(The vertical lines on either side are part of the element being filled, not part of the pattern.)

Unfortunately, between the sizes and distances in the hatch pattern dialogue, and the line-editing dialogue, I haven't managed to even come close. The lines are too close together, and the alternate lines are either ungapped or gapped only at the beginning rather than both ends.

If I say the lines in a hatch are .125in apart, and then the fill sets the distance at .100, how far apart are the hatch lines actually going to be drawn?

Thanks!

Re: Threads

Ken,
There is another step in creating dash patterns that can be used in hatch
and then fill.
Draw a line.
Click on the line and then click on the 'Line Type' button on the properties
for the line.
Click on 'More' at the bottom of the list.
This will display the Custom Line Type dialog.
You can create new line types that can be used in creating a new hatch
style.
Regards,
Rick B.

Re: Threads


Draw a line.
Click on the line and then click on the 'Line Type' button on the properties for the line.
Click on 'More' at the bottom of the list.
This will display the Custom Line Type dialog.


Yes, I've done that -- but I still can't get the end-gapping behaviour I'm seeking.

Also, determining the relationship of the 'distance between lines' value on the hatch itself, and that on the fill ribbon bar, has so far defeated me.

Thanks!

Re: Threads

Ken,
Do you know about 'Display as printed'?
By default gap distances, line thickneses, etc. are view independent.
As you zoom in and out, the gaps and thickneses stay the same.
This is so you can still visualize the geometry at different zoom scales.
You can force the display to be the same as the geometry would be on a
print.
When you set this, gaps and thickneses will increase/decrease with zoom
scale.
It is on the Solid Edge Options - View tab. Check 'Display as Printed'.
I would not suggest always running this way.
It is intended to give you a way to see the display the same as it is on
paper.
Take a look at the End Gap line type. It has equal gaps at both ends.
You will need to create a line type with a combination of End Gap and Dash.
Regards,
Rick B.