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Total Newbie: How to draw a long, profiled cylinder (lathe-turned)?


With apologies,
New to CAD and Solid Edge 2D. I am hoping there is some "key concept" or setting
that will help me find a solution.
The objects I need to draw are long and roughly cylindrical with various straight
contours in their profiles. Think of a long object that would be turned on a lathe,
like a pedestal, or column, or dumbell, except that in my case the sides of the
profile are always straight lines, not curves.
Because they are many times longer than their width there is only one perspective
needed, a cross section lengthwise through the center line. Drawings I have seen
of these shapes always have the dimensions shown from one end and the distance from
the center line.
In other words, each end point of a particular part of the profile has two dimensions:
1) the distance from the end; 2) the distance from the center line. If you were
to "spin" the object around its center line, each point would become a circle.
Using the two dimensions you can know where a section (drawn as a line, but actually
the side of a truncated cone in 3D) will begin OR end. Each point is the end of
one section and the beginning of the next.
The dimensions are written with the distance from the end on one side of the profile
(the top) and the distance from the center line, which is shown as a diameter, on
the other side (the bottom.)
Does this make sense? Is there a name for this kind of drawing?
I went through the tutorial and had no problems drawing and dimensioning a simple
object with the typical dimensions shown as distances between lines, etc. But I
need to start producing these "lathe" drawings and I don't know what concept or
setting I need to adjust to get my drawings to work this way.
Any help at all appreciated.
3 REPLIES

Re: Total Newbie: How to draw a long, profiled cylinder (lathe-turned)?


Tim,
SE2d is a 2D package, you draw the cross sectional profile like you would on a piece
of paper you hand to the machinist.
-AS

"Tim Hicks" wrote:
>
>With apologies,
>
>New to CAD and Solid Edge 2D. I am hoping there is some "key concept" or
>setting
>that will help me find a solution.
>
>The objects I need to draw are long and roughly cylindrical with various straight
>contours in their profiles. Think of a long object that would be turned on
>a lathe,
>like a pedestal, or column, or dumbell, except that in my case the sides of
>the
>profile are always straight lines, not curves.
>
>Because they are many times longer than their width there is only one perspective
>needed, a cross section lengthwise through the center line. Drawings I have
>seen
>of these shapes always have the dimensions shown from one end and the distance
>from
>the center line.
>
>In other words, each end point of a particular part of the profile has two
>dimensions:
>1) the distance from the end; 2) the distance from the center line. If you
>were
>to "spin" the object around its center line, each point would become a circle.
>
>Using the two dimensions you can know where a section (drawn as a line, but
>actually
>the side of a truncated cone in 3D) will begin OR end. Each point is the
>end of
>one section and the beginning of the next.
>
>The dimensions are written with the distance from the end on one side of the
>profile
>(the top) and the distance from the center line, which is shown as a diameter,
>on
>the other side (the bottom.)
>
>Does this make sense? Is there a name for this kind of drawing?
>
>I went through the tutorial and had no problems drawing and dimensioning a
>simple
>object with the typical dimensions shown as distances between lines, etc.
> But I
>need to start producing these "lathe" drawings and I don't know what concept
>or
>setting I need to adjust to get my drawings to work this way.
>
>Any help at all appreciated.

www.continual-motion.com

Re: Total Newbie: How to draw a long, profiled cylinder (lathe-turned)?

Sounds like "coordinate" dimension may get you closest to what you are
after. this is found on the pullout menu under the linear dimension command.
In the ANSI standard it will just put a mark and a value at each of the
locations relative to the origin (CL in your case) without any arrows and
leaders and all that. The ISO standard is different (has arrows and leaders)
and not as concise for this type of thing.
Ds

"Tim Hicks" wrote in message
news:46d6261d$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>
> With apologies,
>
> New to CAD and Solid Edge 2D. I am hoping there is some "key concept" or
> setting
> that will help me find a solution.
>
> The objects I need to draw are long and roughly cylindrical with various
> straight
> contours in their profiles. Think of a long object that would be turned
> on a lathe,
> like a pedestal, or column, or dumbell, except that in my case the sides
> of the
> profile are always straight lines, not curves.
>
> Because they are many times longer than their width there is only one
> perspective
> needed, a cross section lengthwise through the center line. Drawings I
> have seen
> of these shapes always have the dimensions shown from one end and the
> distance from
> the center line.
>
> In other words, each end point of a particular part of the profile has two
> dimensions:
> 1) the distance from the end; 2) the distance from the center line. If
> you were
> to "spin" the object around its center line, each point would become a
> circle.
> Using the two dimensions you can know where a section (drawn as a line,
> but actually
> the side of a truncated cone in 3D) will begin OR end. Each point is the
> end of
> one section and the beginning of the next.
>
> The dimensions are written with the distance from the end on one side of
> the profile
> (the top) and the distance from the center line, which is shown as a
> diameter, on
> the other side (the bottom.)
>
> Does this make sense? Is there a name for this kind of drawing?
>
> I went through the tutorial and had no problems drawing and dimensioning a
> simple
> object with the typical dimensions shown as distances between lines, etc.
> But I
> need to start producing these "lathe" drawings and I don't know what
> concept or
> setting I need to adjust to get my drawings to work this way.
>
> Any help at all appreciated.


Re: Total Newbie: How to draw a long, profiled cylinder (lathe-turned)?


Dan, thanks very much. I started playing with coordinate dimension groups and it
will do what I want. I guess I can use hidden lines to make intersections for the
endpoints and do dot-to-dot to make the profile.
"Dan Staples" wrote:
>Sounds like "coordinate" dimension may get you closest to what you are
>after. this is found on the pullout menu under the linear dimension command.
>
>In the ANSI standard it will just put a mark and a value at each of the
>locations relative to the origin (CL in your case) without any arrows and
>
>leaders and all that. The ISO standard is different (has arrows and leaders)
>
>and not as concise for this type of thing.
>
>Ds
>
>
>"Tim Hicks" wrote in message
>news:46d6261d$1@bbsnotes.ugs.com...
>>
>> With apologies,
>>
>> New to CAD and Solid Edge 2D. I am hoping there is some "key concept" or

>
>> setting
>> that will help me find a solution.
>>
>> The objects I need to draw are long and roughly cylindrical with various

>
>> straight
>> contours in their profiles. Think of a long object that would be turned

>
>> on a lathe,
>> like a pedestal, or column, or dumbell, except that in my case the sides

>
>> of the
>> profile are always straight lines, not curves.
>>
>> Because they are many times longer than their width there is only one
>> perspective
>> needed, a cross section lengthwise through the center line. Drawings I

>
>> have seen
>> of these shapes always have the dimensions shown from one end and the
>> distance from
>> the center line.
>>
>> In other words, each end point of a particular part of the profile has two

>
>> dimensions:
>> 1) the distance from the end; 2) the distance from the center line. If

>
>> you were
>> to "spin" the object around its center line, each point would become a
>> circle.
>> Using the two dimensions you can know where a section (drawn as a line,

>
>> but actually
>> the side of a truncated cone in 3D) will begin OR end. Each point is the

>
>> end of
>> one section and the beginning of the next.
>>
>> The dimensions are written with the distance from the end on one side of

>
>> the profile
>> (the top) and the distance from the center line, which is shown as a
>> diameter, on
>> the other side (the bottom.)
>>
>> Does this make sense? Is there a name for this kind of drawing?
>>
>> I went through the tutorial and had no problems drawing and dimensioning

>a
>> simple
>> object with the typical dimensions shown as distances between lines, etc.

>
>> But I
>> need to start producing these "lathe" drawings and I don't know what
>> concept or
>> setting I need to adjust to get my drawings to work this way.
>>
>> Any help at all appreciated.

>
>