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Accurate colors?

I have a model of a structure that will be painted, and I wanted to examine how different colors would look on it.  So I created some custom colors based on RGB values provided by PPG (the paint manufacturer) and the colors on the model appear a lot lighter than they do on color card samples I have.  The shade is also off somewhat.  Are there some tricks to getting these to match more closely (light control, etc).  Thanks for any suggestions.  

10 REPLIES

Re: Accurate colors?

[ Edited ]

If you are on ST7 or ST8, try rendering the model in Keyshot.

Perhaps you will get to see a closer match.

 

With light control, you are headed in the right direction.

A point light will certainly cause a shade change even over small distance.

So the best option would be a distant light or directional light with the viewing direction same as the direction of the light.

I am still on ST6 - no Keyshot. Most of my understanding of color shades and lights is derived from usage of 3D Studio MAX. but I think these tweaks should apply in your case too.

Re: Accurate colors?

Thanks for the suggestions. I'm on ST7 Foundation, so no Keyshot either :^( unfortunately). But it does have some basic lighting control (I think) so I'll play with that and see how it does. Another thought I had was maybe exporting the model to Google Sketchup and seeing what it can do. It's oriented more towards home/architectural design and may have better tools for accurate color rendering.

Re: Accurate colors?

Might be able to tweak your monitor...?

Bruce Shand
ST9 MP5 - Insight - Win10 - K4200

Re: Accurate colors?

I was also going to mention monitor.  Accurate color reproduction starts with the monitor and some are incapable of accurately representing colors at all.

 

Here is a good resource: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/monitor-calibration.htm

Ken Grundey
Production: ST9 MP4
Testing: ST10

Re: Accurate colors?

pkelecy,

you can adjust shininess, reflectivity and 4 colors in facestyle, reflections, depth fading and 9 lights in viewstyle to change a color on the screen.

 

You can do this easily with my SE-App PST as shown here.

30 days trial version

 

regards

Gerald

 

Re: Accurate colors?

[ Edited ]

Bruce, Ken, I would call that thinking out of the 'box' Robot Happy

Your long experience reflects here.

Re: Accurate colors?

[ Edited ]

There are very cost effective monitor calibration systems out there that help with color calibration and even re-adjust your monitor based on the light in your room. If you need to repeatedly do color matching it's something to consider.

 

Grundey posted a link to a good one. Worth checking out.

Re: Accurate colors?

Pat,

 

I also find, if you are better comparing the resulting SE color to a swatch on your screen, rather than a real world one back to your display, as you'll see different result,...which goes to what the others have suggested.

Sean Cresswell
Design Manager Streetscape Limited
Solid Edge ST9 [MP5] Classic [x2 seats]
Windows 10

Re: Accurate colors?

We also have this with custom colours for specific customers.

 

Keyshot is great for doing proper renders as you can pick pre-made RAL colours etc. but for the SE model view I've found that you get a decent result if you make the Edges, DIffuse, Specuclar and Ambient Colours match the RGB of the colour you want and the Emmission colour black, or almost black.The key to making it reasonably accurate is making the Emission colour very dark, otherwise the colours are too light.  Obviously you can tweek these colours as much as you want, but for a quick fix, this is pretty good.

 

Also remember you'll probably have to divide your RGB vaules by 255 to change them from a 0-255 range to 0-1 range that SE wants.

 

 

If you're interested in what's going on, the Diffuse colour is the 'actual' colour of the part, the Specular is the colour of bright hotspots, e.g. the white spot on a sphere lit by a spot light. The Ambient colour is that when the part is light by indirect light, and emmissive colour is about the colour of light being emmitted from the part, hence it is zero for most things.