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Applying 2D dft block to a 3D surface?

So I have been tasked with figuring out how to do a few things here at work with our relatively new solid edge setup.

 

  • First is to build a parametric base assembly that can be driven by an excel sheet. (work in progress)
  • Second is to setup a set of dft files that display all the relative information per part. (work in progress)
  • Third is to have said dft files have all details auto update per that excel sheet such as name plates showing on the models actually displaying the correct info. (This has been the largest hangup thus far)
  • Fourth is to output a BOM with plate sizes, bolt lengths etc all auto generated with zero user interaction. (no idea how to do this yet.)

I have been told that these are all things that can be done in other programs(pro-e/creo) and that they must be done here soon by us(me).

 

That said, the first big snag I have come across is how to apply a 2d dft block to a 3d surface, the only information I have seen thus far is to screen shot the dft file and turn it into a texture and paint the object in question. I find this to be rather clunky and require far to much user interaction when a requirement of the project is something that can update on the fly with changes to an excel sheet... help!

7 REPLIES
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Accepted by topic author nanan00
‎08-26-2015 04:32 AM

Re: Applying 2D dft block to a 3D surface?

Applying a '2d dft block to a 3d surface' is quite un-usual and the intention is not clear though the texture solution you suggest is obvious that comes to mind.

If you could provide more deatils on what kind of 2D block needs to be put on a surface and for what purpose, meanwhile if you want to convert 2D views to 3D objects, Solid Edge has the Create 3D command:

 

 

~Tushar

www.SurfAndCode.in

 

Re: Applying 2D dft block to a 3D surface?

They want the information in the name plates to show on the general arrangement and name plate drawing to be dynamic and update per the excel sheet we have. These name plates are currently stamped but shortly will be laser etched... which will be another issue.

Basically they want to remove the need for a drafter and just have the engineers update excel sheets and the rest works automagically.
Solution
Solution
Accepted by topic author nanan00
‎08-26-2015 04:32 AM

Re: Applying 2D dft block to a 3D surface?

Variables controlled from Excel can be created in the Variable Table and exposed, which can be picked up in callouts to display on the Draft sheet.

 

Re: Applying 2D dft block to a 3D surface?

That should work, not as elegant as I had hoped but it will get it done.

 

Any insight into how to get plate sizes in a BOM? Most of what we do is 1" to 6" plate welded together. Although there will be burnout drawings we still want an overall BOM that shows required plate size for each item along the way for purchasing.

Re: Applying 2D dft block to a 3D surface?

If you make the plate as a sheet metal part, you can expose the flat pattern sizes. One small piece of the puzzle.

 

In general

Getting a spreadsheet connected to the files I would do as the last step. I would suggest getting all things working as desired using direct input inside the variable tables. Then connect the spreadsheet to the variables last.

 

I have found using a spreadsheet to drive a model is stable. Getting the model to drive a spreadsheet, I have had stability/updating hangups.

Re: Applying 2D dft block to a 3D surface?

The biggest issue I see is creating the text profile on your name plate. All the other items can be achieved by exposing custom variables within your variable table (thus becoming visible in your file properties, which can then be picked up by Solid Edge draft).

 

From what I could see, the words used in a text profile are not avaliable for changing in the variable table in ST7. I would suggest that you make an enhancement request for this to happen...

 

Shane

Shane Murray
ST8 MP6

Re: Applying 2D dft block to a 3D surface?

Ultimately I went with making a dft file of the name plate as a block with all the lines and static text on one layer and the property field text on another. That block is then converted into a dxf for the printer.

 

For the Job book part I just took a screen shot of the filled in name plate in the dft file and painted the nameplate part. Honestly I don't see a point in it as the text is unreadable but this is what the sales and marketing people want and they get what they want.