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Assembly Constraints and stability

PART 1:

What is the most stable way to assemble parts? I ask because we have issues with constraints failing quite often. I believe our major cause of these failed constraints are adjustable hinges. These have been difficult to get to work and once they work they tend to fail. We then have an assembly that looks like this:

 

PART 2:

What is the best way to assemble screws into the holes?

 

Flashfit

Axial align then mate

Axial align then planer align

Insert

 

PART 3:

Are there any notoriously poor ways to assemble parts?

 

Thank you for any help and guidance.

Gabriel Gullickson
Mechanical Drafter
Spectrum Industries
ST8
3 REPLIES

Re: Assembly Constraints and stability

[ Edited ]

Those are loaded questions and I'm sure you'll soon get many answers and queries.

Your adjustable hinge issue is a sore one for me right now. Are the hinges multi-part assemblies or just single adjustable parts?

For screws and such I would say axial align then mate for which there's a simple shortcut in some cases and "capture fit" can also help with fasteners among other parts.

(Except for the "burps" very nice looking model)

Bruce Shand
ST9 MP8 - Insight - Win10 - K4200

Re: Assembly Constraints and stability

These are multi-part assemblies. I try to remember to set up "capture fit" on all fasteners as I use them for the first time. I use axial align then mate. Thank you for the reply and the compliment.

Gabriel Gullickson
Mechanical Drafter
Spectrum Industries
ST8

Re: Assembly Constraints and stability

The quickest way to assemble screws into holes is by using FlashFit and locating the circular edge where the plane and cylinder meet on both the screw and the hole. It will then create the mate and axial align based on the edge. The only caveat is that the axial align is placed with locked rotation so that the screw becomes fully defined with two clicks.

 

Greg