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Assembly process

Phenom
Phenom

I am reviewing some of the online materials and was actually blown away with one video. This video was showing how you assembly components. They had you turn off the setting for Use FlashFit and Reduced Steps.

 

Then I was blown away by the need to identify which component you want to select a face from and then as another step you have to select the face on that component! Wow..really.

 

So my question is a two part question. Why is this even a setting option? And when would you want to use this process of identifying the component to select the face from?

8 REPLIES

Re: Assembly process

Legend
Legend

I almost never use flash fit and almost always use the four step selection.  WAY too many faces in our assemblies, I personally have found it faster to select the part then be able to select the face of that part "through" the other parts that are translucent or now dimmed.  Removing the settings would be very dissapointing. 


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Re: Assembly process

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

@RyanM,

 

The 4 step process was around prior to FlashFit.  I use FlashFit 99.99% of the time.   

The only time I turn it off is when I'm trying to relate to a plane, surface, or some other entity not shown in the default view.   The 4 step option allows you to pick the part, and prior to picking the intended face you can toggle on construction geometry, sketches, planes, etc..  and then use those as your 4th pick.


Matt Johnson
Solid Edge Certified Professional (ST7 & ST8)
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Re: Assembly process

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

There are a couple of reasons you would want to use the option to select the part first, especially when working in large assemblies (and hence the option).

 

First, faces can only be located on active parts. It may not be the case when working in a small assembly, but when you are working in a large assembly there is a good chance that a good number of the parts will be inactive. When you use the option to select the part before the face, the part is automatically activated so you can then immediately start locating faces on the part. If the option to select the part first is not set and you want to select a face from a part that is inactive, you must first go run the Activate Part command, select the part to activate and exit the command before you can start locating a face.

 

So the steps in each scenario for selecting a face on an inactive part:

 

With the option to select the part set:

  1. Start the assemble command
  2. Select the part containing the face you want to constrain
  3. Select the face on the part

Without the option to select the part set:

  1. Start the Assemble command
  2. Go click the Activate Part button on the Assemble command bar
  3. Select the part containing the face you want to constrain
  4. Select the face on the part

 

The other main reason you would want to use this option is that it restricts the number of faces that are located - again very useful in the context of large assemblies. When you use the option to select the part before selecting the face, only faces that are on that part can be located. If you are not selecting the part first, faces from any active part are located. If you have a bunch of active parts under the cursor and want to select a face that is on a part that is near the bottom of the z-order, you will be presented the faces from all of the active parts higher in the z-order first. This means you might need to go search through a large number of faces in QuickPick before you finally find the one you are interested in. If you have just a couple of active parts under the cursor, it may not seem like a big deal. However, if you have a large number of active parts under the cursor, you may have hundreds of faces that are eligible that you must then filter through looking for the one you want.

 

Greg

Re: Assembly process

Phenom
Phenom

@GregLuckett

Great examples! Thank you for taking the time to respond.

 

My brain is wired to think UG/NX so I forget that there is an active part "component" to assemblies when working with Solid Edge. NX has a "Partial Load" function when it loads components. This option loads enough geometry to show the component and enough geometry to allow to apply mating conditions/relations to components without fully loading the whole part file- which includes the full brep model, history tree, drawing information (if not using Master Model concept), etc. 

 

Re: Assembly process

Phenom
Phenom

@bnemec If I understand you correctly you are using the 4- step process as a filter for working with large assemblies.

 

My follow-up question is what do you identify as "large assembly?" How many components (total including pattern qtys) and how many unique components (pattern qty ignored)?

Betreff: Assembly process

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

Hi @RyanM

 

 

 

when we started with SE this was the one and only way for placing parts into an assembly.

And I have seen that this method still is the better one for beginners and if harbinger larger assemblies.

And large can beginn with 50 parts too.

If there are several faces at the same position (bolt, nut, washer, part1, part2) this predilection of interest part saves a lot of wrong selection, mismatched relations and so.

Modifications and changes need more time than 2 additional mouse clicks.

 

So this 4 step placing still could help saving time!

 

regards
Wolfgang

Re: Assembly process

Legend
Legend

@RyanM, As you say, a filter.  I probably should not have used "large"  perhaps "busy" would have been a better word.  I beleive @hawcad posted a good answer here.  Also, having many faces in one area (maybe ~15 will show up in the QuickPick, making it not so quick)  @GregLuckett did explain this very nicely.

 

We have very few patterns in our assemblies.

 

Another factor to how many faces may show up is if you work with fully constrained assemblies or if youre developing an assembly that is designed to have motion.  If I'm not mistaken, fully constrained components are not available for selection when placing relationships.  I should probably make more use of this, but I also use the drag command frequently during development.

 

Another thing I struggle with is how long it sometimes takes for a face to highlight or to un-highlight, this I assume is a graphics or processor short comming.  Turning off that glow was the first thing many of us did when we went to ST9.

 

 


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Re: Assembly process

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

@bnemec wrote:

 

  If I'm not mistaken, fully constrained components are not available for selection when placing relationships.  I should probably make more use of this, but I also use the drag command frequently during development.

 

I had to check and yes fully constrained parts are available for multiple or conflicting constraints in some cases. If reduced steps is off but you use the assemble tool you can select features of a fully constrained part. But you can't when you place a relation directly. If you pick flash fit you can. If reduced steps is on then you definitely can. I never knew this until I tried it just now. But in any case if it conflicts then it warns and won't be placed.

 

And totally agree on the glow. I hate the glow.

Bruce Shand
ST10 MP10 - Insight - Win10 - K4200