Cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Computer Specs

Creator
Creator

I am looking for some feedback from other users on specing out a new CAD station.  Here is what Dell has speced out for a replacemnent CAD station. What are some thoughts on a HDD versus a SSD. I am seeing more pros then cons with going to a SSD.  Thank you in advance for your feedback.

 

ST9 MP8

 

  • Dell Precision Tower 5810 XCTO Base
  • Intel Xeon Processor E5-1620 v4 (4C, 3.5GHz, 3.8GHz Turbo, 2400MHz, 10MB, 140W
  • NVIDIA Quadro M2000 4GB (4 DP) (1 DP to SL-DVI adapter)
  • 64GB (4x16GB) 2400MHz DDR4 RDIMM ECC
  • 500GB 3.5inch Serial ATA (7,200 Rpm) Hard Drive
  • Integrated Intel AHCI chipset SATA controller (6 x 6.0Gb/s) - SW RAID 0/1/5/10
  • C1 SATA 3.5 Inch, 1-2 Hard Drives
8 REPLIES

Re: Computer Specs

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

SSD's are awesome for performance but obviously come at a price if you have large local storage needs.  We have converted almost entirely over to mobile workstations (laptops) and with those being put to sleep/suspended/shutdown often during the workday as people move them from desk to conference room and back, SSD's are a necessity.

 

For desktops that do not go through the frequent start and stop process, it really comes down to transient files.  If you have a PDM system (they all cache files local to open/save them) or store your SE files locally, the SSD will be indispensable.  If all of your files are accessed from a network server, then the SSD will not be as much of an advantage to justify the added cost as the files are never stored locally.  Some exceptions to that are cloud based servers like OneDrive which store the files you access locally.



Ken

Production: ST10 MP6
Testing: SE 2019

Re: Computer Specs

Builder
Builder

I agree with Kenny, it depends on your network and where most of the files are going to be stored and used.  We use Optiplex dells with hdd in them.  Everything that we do is listed on the network. The hdds are just for the program to "convert" and use as an interface.  In short, if you are going to use your computer as a stand alone, use the sdd, you'll get a quicker upload time from computer boot to program start.  But if you're going full tree net, use the hdds and save the sdd for the network, there's where you'll need the beef or go virtual on the network drives (major moolah).

 

 

Re: Computer Specs

Honored Contributor
Honored Contributor

SE is single threaded. More than two CPU's does not help.

 

What does matter is a good vid card, Mhz, and Hard drive seek time.

 

I reccomend BOXX computer, or if cash is tight a XI computer.

Re: Computer Specs

PLM World Member Phenom PLM World Member Phenom
PLM World Member Phenom

That is not entirely correct.

 

Parasolid has some mutli-threading capability in it.  Likewise, Solid Edge does also.

 

Drawing view updates are multi-threaded.

I believe that Assembly releationships are multi-threaded, but I could be wrong.

Part modeling is still single threaded to the extent that Parasolid is.

 

And having extra cores (available threads) while Solid Edge is crunching away is nice in order to stream music, check email, etc.  But, I will add, that usually the screen is locked up during certain operations.  So, as mentioned before, a good graphics card is a better investment over more cores (once you've reached the  single-threaded GHz cap).

 


____________________________________
--Scott Wertel, P.E.

Re: Computer Specs

Phenom
Phenom
An i7 CPU with the same speed will have same performance as the xeon at a better price, then invest the saved money to an SSD.

Re: Computer Specs

Hello everyone,

 

I agree with Fiorini. Rather spend the money on a high spec i7 CPU and a primary SSD drive of 256gb in size.

 

Regards,

Theodore

Kind regards,
Theodore Turner

Re: Computer Specs

I am also not sure if it is worth spending your money on 64GB of ECC RAM. We have huge assemblies and run i7's with SSD's and 16GB of non-ECC RAM.

 

Using ECC RAM for servers is a no-brainer but I find it difficult to justify the extra cost (special motherboard plus ECC RAM) for a CAD workstation.

 

Regards,

Theodore

Kind regards,
Theodore Turner

Re: Computer Specs

PLM World Member Phenom PLM World Member Phenom
PLM World Member Phenom

Unless you are running a lot of simulation on that workstation, ECC is not worth the extra cost.


____________________________________
--Scott Wertel, P.E.