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Does SE support the ability to divide the graphics area into multiple viewing areas?

it's just not being taught.  In NX this was called a Layout. We could have up to 8 views in a layout.

 

This provides the user the ability to work on large assemblies or view different areas of an assembly or design at one time and allow you to pick back and forth across the windows. An example of using this would be the measuring of distances between points/objects that are small and not able to be seen/picked from the "fit" screen. You would pick you base point in one view and then select the second point in the other view. This reduced the need to all the view manipulaitng (zooming out, rotating, soom in, ect.) to select the other points.

The user also has the ability to "expand" the view to make it "full screen" if desired and return back to the divided views.

 

Is there any such capability within SE?

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Accepted by topic author RyanM
‎08-26-2015 04:32 AM

Re: Does SE support the ability to divide the graphics area into multiple viewing areas?

SE does not have an automated system but you can create multiple windows with different views of the same model and either arrange them on screen or switch between them. Better to use a 3Dconnexion device to control the view dynamically.

Thanks,
Ken

Production: ST9 MP7
Testing: ST10

Re: Does SE support the ability to divide the graphics area into multiple viewing areas?

Ken-
Thanks for the quick response. I'd like to learn more about he views. I have Space Navigator and while this is a nice tool that allows a person to translate, rotate and zoom all at the same time I still feel that utilizing views can be very beneficial in many different ways.

If you have the time to write a quick procedure I would greatly appreciate it.

Just some historical perspective on this. I've been in CA...

Just some historical perspective on this. I've been in CAD going on 30 years now....

 

We used to have four viewports and a big view standard (and two monitors) back in 1984. And all the menus were on tablets on the table -- no screen real estate taken up.  And all the way through the early nineties I was convinced you could not be productive without this. Even before the time Solid Edge (and SolidWorks and others) came into being, menus moved to on screen and the "style" became a single big view. I think this came about because view rotation was suddenly fast and easy with the newest graphics cards.

 

Anyhow, most systems have "some way" to still do the multiple views thing, but it really fell out of vogue about 20 years ago IMO. In Solid Edge, make sure to use Ctrl F, Ctrl T, Ctrl R, Ctrl L, Ctrl B, and Ctrl K to swap quickly between standard views. (hopefully the mnemonics are obvious, except that K is for Back since both Back and Bottom start with the same letter). 

Dan Staples
Director, Solid Edge Product Development

Re: Just some historical perspective on this. I've been in CA...

Dan-
Thank for your reply. I'm from the same 'old school' background where you flipped the welding helmet down to repaint the green phosphorus monitors on the VAX terminals and all the dials and pfk tablets.

I am glad to hear that SE still has the capability to divide the graphics area. The concept of divided areas was that it allowed you to view different areas of a design at one time. So that when you made a change in one area you could see the effects immediately in another or allowed you to have different views of the same product showing different design options (one view showing component A and another showing Component B) on a side-by-side comparison. These functions are still valid today wouldn't you agree? I also know SE has configurations that allow you a similar functionality. I'm digging more into those latter this week.

The use of standard views is a good idea, a good way to quickly change view orientations, gives my left hand something to do and takes me back to the days of the AutoCAD 9 with defining all the keyboard shortcuts- not a bad thing. ;-)

My concern is that "standard" views are based on the design philosophy of bottom up design. In some cases, we don't have that options. You are given design references and you have to work inside the assembly design coordinate system. The top view of the designed component or assy is no longer parallel to absolute X-Y plane.

Maybe I am bring too many of my past habits with me but that is why I am asking for alternatives. If they are faster methods and these method allow me to get the job done in a consistent and repeatable fashion I'm more than happy to embrace it- with a bit of grumbling. ;-)

RyanM

Re: Just some historical perspective on this. I've been in CA...

For views that aren't square to the base coordinate system, you have the Look at Face option in the lower right to allow you to square the views.

Because I too believe screen splitting is no longer necessary, this is what I do to mimic that ability- you can rotate the model to a different area and hit Undo/Redo back and forth to see the effects of a design change. I toggle undo/redo quite a bit to view large/complicated changes when I want to see their effects in different areas. I have never felt a need to go back to multiple views.
-Dylan Gondyke
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Accepted by topic author RyanM
‎08-26-2015 04:32 AM

Hi,   Here is a video, I think this will help:   Solid E...

Hi,

 

Here is a video, I think this will help:

 

Solid Edge offers multiple view (as Kan mentioned), but I suggest to use "saved views".

Sorry for HUN UI.

 

BR,

Imi

Imics
http://solidedgest.wordpress.com/

Re: Hi,   Here is a video, I think this will help:   Solid E...

Thank you so much. That is what I was looking for. Old school or not it's still a good tool to use.
I also think you might get some "oohs" and "aaahs" when you have this turned on and showing other people.