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Re: Graphic connection to assembly

Honored Contributor
Honored Contributor

I only use a single slot for part name and number. Apparently the same ones other are using.

 

When making a drawing of a single sheet metal part, that drawing shows gage, CutX and Cut y in the bill of materials. that drawing shows the part number created as a result.

 

When that part is used in an assembly, the assembly parts list shows the part number that is a result of the drawing that made the part, and I don't want that drawing to show the CutX and CutY. The simplest way to get that done is insert the part into an assembly by it's self, and entered the finished parts number into the assembly. That assembly is instered into the next level assembly drawing. This is also true for me with frame pieces like angles that have a few holes.

 

The controlling factor here is being able to issue drawing for stock parts and get that part into our system and issues for manufacturing stock parts. When that is not needed, then I don't go through that extra set of steps.

 

In this way, the user of the drawing knows if they need to go get a part off the shelf or if they need to go cut steel to make the part.

Re: Graphic connection to assembly

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

Is the part number for that part the same on the single sheet metal part drawing and in the assembly you insert it in plus the higher level assy?

Bruce Shand
SE2019 MP5 - Insight - Win10 - K4200

Re: Graphic connection to assembly

Honored Contributor
Honored Contributor

YES and NO, Stock sheets don't have a part number, just a gage and size because they could come nested from any size sheet or scrap. Angles do have a stock number because everything is 20' sticks.

 

But in general, the origional sheet metal part does not have a part number until it's has been fabricated. The frabricated part has a part number and sometimes has threads welded to it (Bung, coupling, weldnut). The result of that drawing is a "stock part". that part has a name and number.

 

The "part" when it shows up in a drawing where it's used can't display the Gage,  CutX and CutY, only the part number to be pulled.

 

Then sometimes  two part w/ numbers. Or a new drawing uses one "part" and fabricates another part to be welded together.

 

Every combibination imaginable is needed for different cases. Yes in some cases, no in others. it depends on if the part has anything welded to it. In the case where it does not have anything welded, and it's a stock part, and it's not coated beacuse it will be welded in place, then YES. but that does not change the need to remove the display of gage, and cuts.

 

In every case where it does not use that number, I use palce holder designatito name the sheet file. Like L1 for lid 1 and P1 for Pan 1 and B1 for body 1

Re: Graphic connection to assembly

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

Too hard to follow without being there I think.

But this part I don't get: 'The "part" when it shows up in a drawing where it's used can't display the Gage,  CutX and CutY, only the part number to be pulled'

I don't understand the need for an assembly so that doesn't show up. Just don't display that stuff. Unless you have other parts on the same BOM that does show that stuff.

Bruce Shand
SE2019 MP5 - Insight - Win10 - K4200

Re: Graphic connection to assembly

Honored Contributor
Honored Contributor

Ding. Stock parts are the "common" parts of tanks being welded together. Most of the drawing that call out a stock parts are are mainly other newly fabriacted sheet metal, angles, and what I call weldthreads

 

I'm attaching a typical example of a stock part and assembly it is used on.