How can I do this?

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

OK. We have a client in ill health that wants to have a carving of his boat on the urn that will hold his ashes. I have a decent 3D model that we can carve but I want to scale the Y axis so that the relief carving is not too proud of the surface (see attached image). Some of the pieces are surfaces and some are solid bodies. Is there a way to import this and then scale it only in the Y axis to about 1/8th scale? Anyone have any thoughts?

Regards

Peter Smith

5 REPLIES

Re: How can I do this?

Phenom
Phenom

Create a new part and insert a Part Copy of the existing part or asm.  In the dialog box, you can scale the copy uniformly in XYZ or choose different scales for different axes (among other options).

Re: How can I do this?

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

I tried that with the simplfied assembly and I got an error message. I think I got the error because of the mix of surfaces and solids. I will try importing the design assembly and see what happens.

One other aspect is we want the carved part rolled around the Y axis before it gets scaled.

Re: How can I do this?

PLM World Member Phenom PLM World Member Phenom
PLM World Member Phenom

Graybarn,

 

Depending on who will be carving the image into the urn, there are CAM packages that can take images and generate toolpaths to create the effect you are looking for.  I'm far from an expert on this but I've been looking to add a CNC router to my R&D area so I've been looking into different packages.  You might want try http://www.cnczone.com/forums/

 

I've been looking at the various CAM packages from Vectric.  You'll need a way to wrap the image around the A axis.  

 

Kyle

Kyle Joiner
IPA LLC
ST9 MP1

Re: How can I do this?

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

I have taken a dumb approach to this. I created a draft document of the assembly in the correct orientation, changed that to a 2D dumb model, copied the outlines onto a sketch in the par evironment and then created this.We are going to cut a test piece and then tune it up further...

Re: How can I do this?

Esteemed Contributor
Esteemed Contributor

For a dumb approach it looks pretty smart.

Bruce Shand
ST9 MP8 - Insight - Win10 - K4200