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How do you/your company fundamentally communicate the Quantity of parts required to your shop floor?

Pioneer
Pioneer

Hello all,

 

We've been having a bit of an internal debate so I thought it would  be useful to see how other companies function in terms of their manufacturing drawings.

 

My question is, what method do you use to communicate to the shop floor how much of something needs to be made?

 

For example, do you all use BOMs, do you show quantities on individual drawings, do you show how many Assembly/Weldments needs to be made?

 

Part two of the question is, what part of Solid Edge do you use to manage this? ie do you export to Excel, do you use Property Manager and create a parts list?

 

Basically i'm looking to see how other companies manage the fundamental part of CAD of letting the shop floor know how many parts, sheet metal, assembly and weldments need to be made for different jobs.

 

I'm especially interested to know if you show individual quantities on each drawing, or if you have one overall list issued separately. Maybe you use separate software entirely.

 

Obviously this will be highly industry specific which is why i'm intrigued to know. Hoping to gain some inspiration as to how we can be improving upon things.

 

Thanks!

 

6 REPLIES

Re: How do you/your company fundamentally communicate the Quantity of parts required to your shop fl

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

@User_Error

 

For our product side, we have an ERP system that generates tickets for required parts/assemblies on the shop floor.  We do not drive this from CAD because of the immense number of configurations in both size and options of our products.

 

For our equipment/tooling, I'm not as intimate with the approach they are using so I'd rather @berkut040 respond with that info.



Ken
Production: ST10 MP7, Testing: SE 2019
http://Grundey.blogspot.com

Re: How do you/your company fundamentally communicate the Quantity of parts required to your shop fl

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

Interesting to know how others do this. We make fixed seating for theaters, school, auditoria,... So much nearly the same assembly's per project made of several reused parts.

I first draw a 3D model of 2 'standard' chairs and a seating layout with this drawing in 2D in AutoCAD. When the project can go to production we draw all the needed assembly's.

Every weldment gets a number, I place this number on my autocad layout (the number is a block). This is for double use.

Our people use this layout to know wich weldment needs to be placed where:80YJrg1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I can do a "bcount" or "dbcount" to count my weldments. I use this to fill in my excel sheet (colums)

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In the rows I fill the parts.

I can fill the needed quantity of each part for each weldment. At the end I can see the total needed parts.

This quantity I fill in, in the properties (custom property) of my part or sheet metal file:

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In the assembly the same for the assembly quantity, but also a BOM/weldment:

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This works good for us, but the fact we need to make a custom propery "quatity" makes us think this is not the way SE is designed.

 

...........................................................................................................
Solid Edge 2019 & AutoCAD 2019 user

Re: How do you/your company fundamentally communicate the Quantity of parts required to your shop fl

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

Here we do add a quantity for the number of assemblies needed to a view caption that includes a brief description of what it is and a reference to number of assemblies needed. This is a practice that I don't like nor agree with but it's a legacy from the AutoCad days 5 or 6 years ago. We also still manually create parts lists for fasteners and vendor supplied parts. Something else I don't like and also a legacy.

Bruce Shand
ST10 MP7 - Insight - Win10 - K4200

Re: How do you/your company fundamentally communicate the Quantity of parts required to your shop fl

Legend
Legend

The way I am doing it now is every product we make has a .par file for every* component that will be used (except welds because SE welds suck) that are all in an assembly. From that assembly I make a parts list that shows; item number (%{Item Number|G}), quantity (%{Quantity|G}), description (%{Title|G}), drawing (%{Document Number|G}), rev. (%{Revision number|G}), material (%{Material|G}), weight (%{Mass (Item)|G}), remarks (%{Comments|G}). From the parts list I export it to an excel sheet that has a few macros to adjust the quantities based on how many units we will actually make. The excel sheet is uploaded into our ERP(E2) for the purchasing department to use and a PDF of the BOM is published to the shop for the floor to use as reference.

 

We are making heavier and heavier use of a master model system where many of the manually entered fields just carry over from job to job as standardized parts. The number of unique to job drawings has dropped by 50% in the last 3 years as I have worked to standardize our design and work process.

 

*for some components I have not found a good method of determining the number required in SE as it is a pattern based on the interior surfaces of parts of the product. For these items I manually calculate and enter the numbers into the excel sheet.

 

Re: How do you/your company fundamentally communicate the Quantity of parts required to your shop fl

Genius
Genius

@nanan00

 

Would using User-Defined quanty be something for you to set the required QTY?
https://docs.plm.automation.siemens.com/tdoc/se/110/se_help/#uid:xid1206783

 

--------------------------------------------------

Marc Boom
marc.boom@quayquip.com
www.quayquip.com

Re: How do you/your company fundamentally communicate the Quantity of parts required to your shop fl

Phenom
Phenom

I don't put quantities on the individual part or assembly drawing because if it's copied to another job, the quantities need to be changed manually, and I don't like injecting unnecessary room for human error into things. Usually what I do is on my assemblies and subassemblies I do a parts list, that tells you how many of a certain part is in that assembly. It's like this all the way to the top level. Then I drop the top level into another assembly for the overall job, and use occurence properties to do a user defined quantity of each top level assembly if necessary. Then I save that as the job number and add EXP BOM to the end of the file name, then make a drawing, in that drawing I do an exploded parts list so every thing that is in this job is listed with it's quantities. Print it off for the shop, I copy contents of that parts list and paste into an excel spreadsheet for the purchasing guys and done.

ST9
Windows 7 Professional
Nvidia K2200 & Intel Xeon
"You're doing it wrong"