Indication of drawing scale

Experimenter
Experimenter

Hello,

This is my first post ever, please be kind. I've been fighting a battle with my older colleges about the need to indicate scale on drawings. We design everything in 1:1 in 3D and place everything at a given scale to fit on metric A1 title block. We do not print anything full size, instead we print to 11x17 which is reduced at some odd factor. We also have noted on all our drawings "DO NOT SCALE DRAWING". I've also read several post about the issues of printing at scale accurately.

So I'm trying to make the argument that indication of scale on drawings is irrelevant and not required. I'm not arguing that scale factors be used correctly, just not indicated.

I would love to hear anyone's thoughts on this.

Thank you.

Sanfobr
Solid Edge ST7
19 REPLIES

Re: Indication of drawing scale

Esteemed Contributor
Esteemed Contributor

Yea, that's kind of an "old school" meets "new school" thing.  Once you hit CAD and are using printed from on screen media drawings, scale is meaningless with one exception...

If you translate drawings to DXF/DWG for vendors, then the scale is meaningful to them. 


Thanks,
Ken

Production: ST9 MP10
Testing: ST10 MP1

Re: Indication of drawing scale

Solution Partner Genius Solution Partner Genius
Solution Partner Genius

According to NEN 5308, scale and projection etc. are compulsory, and not a choice. Look at the standards your drawing with and decide whether you draw according to them or not.

 

If you draw according to the standards you don't have a choice.

 

If not you can leave it out, but I wouldn't.

Re: Indication of drawing scale

MLombard
Retired

I agree with Ken. I think scale on the print is mostly pointless. On the other hand, it doesn't cost you anything, and this is an argument that even if you win, you don't really win anything. Is this really worth annoying your senior colleagues? It's something you have in a template and forget it. The most valid argument against it is if people are actually taking measurements from the drawing, and the scale isn't accurate even on the originals. Still, any enterprising scoff-law can figure out the actual scale with a dimension on the print, a 6" ruler, and a calculator.

 

If you want to keep fighting, you might get the quality department involved.

Retired Community Manager for Solid Edge. This account is no longer active.

Re: Indication of drawing scale

PLM World Member Phenom PLM World Member Phenom
PLM World Member Phenom

There is a great conversation about this very topic over on eng-tips.

http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=394130


____________________________________
--Scott Wertel, P.E.

Re: Indication of drawing scale

Esteemed Contributor
Esteemed Contributor

@swertel,

Scott, what you said in that thread about scales being useful for a reviewer to get a quick visual indicator of relative size makes a lot of sense to me. Especially in large or multisheet drawings where a lot of parts are scaled differently for clarity. He's going to want that info to understand what he's looking at and if they're not indicated he'll have to compare given dimensions to get the gist. Scales are a useful shortcut in those instances.

Bruce Shand
ST9 MP10 - Insight - Win10 - K4200

Re: Indication of drawing scale

Legend
Legend

Unless you have a high end plotter you are not getting a good scale print anyway... Most of our drawings are done on a B or D border but both are printed on 11x17, it is rare for anything to be printed on actual D size paper.

 

We have a section in our title block for scale, I hard coded it for NONE for solid edge and pre-filled it as NONE in our autocad blocks.

Re: Indication of drawing scale

PLM World Member Phenom PLM World Member Phenom
PLM World Member Phenom
And I should clarify a bit more, @bshand.

Even though the drawings aren't printed/plotted to scale, being able to look at the scale on the drawing and seeing the relative scale tells me whether or not I can overlay two printouts to get a visual idea of interference, especially when the assembly drawing doesn't have a clear projection.

And this only works if the sheet size are the same, thus the reason to keep the A, B, C, or D in the title block also. In a pinch, I can overlay two B-size printouts of D-size drawings if they have the same scale. Overlaying a B-size printout D- and C-size drawing, not so much.

____________________________________
--Scott Wertel, P.E.

Re: Indication of drawing scale

Honored Contributor
Honored Contributor

I remember back with original AutoCAD revision 10: scales, text and dims were a huge pain. Happy those days are gone.

 

One thing I did learn along the way is that Abode products do actually understand scale. If you print to the driver that comes with acrobat, and print using acrobat, you can actually be printing to an accurate scale.

 

For Solid edge. I have found that for each page of a draft, the first view inserted control the displayed scale if you have scale displaying automatically in the title block. Once in a while, I will move the first view off the page to have control of the displayed scale.

 

Scale printed drawing are only of real value if you are working with small parts that are only 4 to 8 times larger than the paper. Past that, measuring something on the hard copy is not accurate enough.

 

The other thing that creates a check for plotted scales is the old school black and white bar with an indication as to what 1" is. Then the final scale can be checked.

Re: Indication of drawing scale

PLM World Member Phenom PLM World Member Phenom
PLM World Member Phenom

@nanan00, we use NONE for A-size prints of bulk items or Source Control and Vendor Control items that may not have a drawing view; or, that we may not have a model of so can't make a scaled drawing, but can import a picture from the vendor's website so Receiving Inspection at least knows what they're looking at.

 

Isometric views are also NOT TO SCALE so if the drawing only contains an ISO view, we insert NONE into the title block.


____________________________________
--Scott Wertel, P.E.