STEP FILES CONVERSION TO SOLID EDGE

Experimenter
Experimenter

Hello all,

 

I am currently trying to see if there is a way to make changes to a part step file through solid edge. I can open the part no problem. I then go to the ordered tree and the only thing there is one bodyfeature. I would like to be able to see the features and commands used to make the 3D model. Is this possible? Is there a different way to translate the part into solidedge?

 

Thanks!

7 REPLIES

Re: STEP FILES CONVERSION TO SOLID EDGE

Esteemed Contributor
Esteemed Contributor

The STEP file does not have feature/command information... It represents just the body.  Any translation pretty much does the same thing.  Some CAD systems will make up features/commands for imported models with a "feature recognition" module, but it is not what was originally in the authoring system.  This is not needed to the same level in Solid Edge due to Synchronous commands being able to edit the body efficiently however there are commands to recognize holes, patterns, chamfers due to the intelligence required of these features.


Thanks,
Ken

Production: ST9 MP10
Testing: ST10 MP1

Re: STEP FILES CONVERSION TO SOLID EDGE

Experimenter
Experimenter

We currently do not use the Synchronous commands. We used ordered commands. So I am guessing there isn't a way to make changes to the model?

Re: STEP FILES CONVERSION TO SOLID EDGE

MLombard
Retired

@James4642 is there a reason you are not using Synchronous? That's like saying you're not going to use your left leg. Imported data is really the "super power" of Synchronous. You're limiting yourself unecessarily if you try to edit imported data with ordered features. If you can post a single part, someone can demonstrate how easy it is. There are also plenty of Youtube demos of imported parts being edited with Synchronous, if you don't mind seeing demo parts being used.

 

Like this one for example:

Retired Community Manager for Solid Edge. This account is no longer active.

Re: STEP FILES CONVERSION TO SOLID EDGE

Esteemed Contributor
Esteemed Contributor

@James4642 As @MLombard said, there is absolutely no reason not to use Sync on imported models as the benefits are extraordinary.  There are ways to do this in Ordered using the Move/Rotate/Delete Face commands but they are very cumbersome and limited to use compared to just doing the edits in Synch.


Thanks,
Ken

Production: ST9 MP10
Testing: ST10 MP1

Re: STEP FILES CONVERSION TO SOLID EDGE

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

I've recently used Sync on two large castings which were imported from a different CAD system (as parasolids).  Sync allowed me to make some complex edits in a couple of days.  Remoddeling would have been at least a week.  As others have said, embrace it!


CAD/CAE Manager
ST8 MP12

Re: STEP FILES CONVERSION TO SOLID EDGE

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

I had to chime in here, because of this quote "is there a reason you are not using Synchronous? That's like saying you're not going to use your left leg."

 

Because there is a gator attached to my left leg named Sync, it's very painful and until the pain is gone I won't use my left leg.  It's human nature to take the path of least resistance, correct?

 

Now with that said Sync is the best and fastest way to modify imported models.  If I had to do that kind of work I would definitely use Sync, but for everything else it would be ordered.

 

Sorry @MLombard I wasn't trying to discredit what your saying, just my view of what I'm seeing and hearing from our group.

Re: STEP FILES CONVERSION TO SOLID EDGE

MLombard
Retired

@cadnerd You're not discrediting me, I just feel that you may be missing out on an opportunity. People are sometimes afraid of changing. Without having a look at your specific situation, we can't offer you a solution. There are some limited areas where Sync is not the best choice, but it is unlikely that your entire product uses all of these. We don't advocate totally abandoning Ordered modeling. It's not one or the other. Depending on what you are doing, you can probably make use of 80% synchronous design and 20% ordered. That's a generalization without knowing anything about what you do. If you do mostly surfaced parts, then the ratio is probably the other way around. If you're doing mainly machine design, then the guess might be close.

Retired Community Manager for Solid Edge. This account is no longer active.