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Solid Works

Genius
Genius

Hi guys.

 

Is it possible to open a .easm file in solid edge?

9 REPLIES

Re: Solid Works

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

No, that is an eDrawings file for viewing designs using the free eDrawings viewer:

http://www.edrawingsviewer.com/

 

To be able to work on the design you would need to get the *.sldprt & *.sldasm files.

Solid Edge ST10 MP10 - Windows 10 - K2000

Re: Solid Works

Phenom
Phenom

@DaveG 

Dave is correct. The eDrawing format is viewing file based on HOOPS viewer. Siemens viewing tools are based on JT- the ISO standard for 3D visualization.

 

With today's technology it will be a blessing when people start using the newer forms of collaborating. Passing files via email is soooo 20th Century. ;-)

 

I can't wait to see how the Solid Edge Portal is going to work. Especially since it is a multi-CAD environment!
https://www.plm.automation.siemens.com/en/products/solid-edge/portal/

 

Re: Solid Works

Valued Contributor
Valued Contributor

@RyanM

Me too! Really like the direction things are going in.

I'm still trying to get over how well SE works with dropbox.

Solid Edge ST10 MP10 - Windows 10 - K2000

Re: Solid Works

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

With today's technology it will be a blessing when people start using the newer forms of collaborating. Passing files via email is soooo 20th Century. ;-)

 

Passing files via e-mail?  Geez, I remember the days of creating a blue print of a drawing, then cutting it into 8.5 x 11 sheets, numbering each sheet, then sending/receiving through a fax machine with thermographic paper that we then had to tape all the received fax pages back together, and then immediately blueprint the taped sheets before the thermographic paper discoloured and the details lost.  Young 'uns today have it so easy ;-)

 

BTW I also used to walk to school with no shoes in the snow uphill both ways ;-)

Re: Solid Works

Phenom
Phenom

And by blueprint you mean one of those old ammonia based machines that would chase everyone from the office if something went wrong and the odor became too strong? 

 

Ahhhhhh.....those were the days!

 

I am certainly glad we don't have to do that anymore!

Bob Henry
REH Technical Consulting
Canonsburg, PA 15317

Re: Solid Works

Siemens Phenom Siemens Phenom
Siemens Phenom

Yep, and creating brownlines through those machines was even worse than creating the blueprints :-(

 

Re: Solid Works

Phenom
Phenom

@rehenryjr wrote:

And by blueprint you mean one of those old ammonia based machines that would chase everyone from the office if something went wrong and the odor became too strong? 

 

Ahhhhhh.....those were the days!

 

I am certainly glad we don't have to do that anymore!


When I was a lad (yaawwwnnn) and just started work, doing prints, cleaning the printer and changing the ammonia bottles were some of the jobs I had to do.

I wasn't happy with the regular dose of fumes and during an office move, from a pre-WW2 building to a nice new one, I found an old gas mask. I then started wearing it to change the bottles !

Very clearly made my point.

HP Z420 16GB RAM
Quadro K4000
ST10 MP6 on Windows 10 Pro 64.

Re: Solid Works

PLM World Member Phenom PLM World Member Phenom
PLM World Member Phenom

I never found the gas mask, but I did complain enough that my boss did finally have an exhaust fan installed in the copy room so I could have it running while changing the ammonia bottles.


____________________________________
--Scott Wertel, P.E.

Re: Solid Works

Phenom
Phenom

I'm with you too. I had to run the large automotive blue prints. Those where J-size drawings that could reach 15 feet long. Then you had to fold them up and stuff them in mailboxes! One ECO would require at least 6 sets of prints. The fun part was keeping the feed straight enough not to jamb the blueprint machine up! The worst part was plotting those drawings...walking around the engineering complex, putting the plotter queue on hold, releasing each section of the plot in order, setting up the roll-feed and then zeroing out each section of the plot then finally release the next section in the queue, repeat! And finally pray that the ink plotter didn't wet the paper down too much and snag the paper while printing.

 

I was thrilled the day we got an electrostatic printer. Didn't have to deal with pen plotter. But sure did destroy plenty of ties and shirts with the liquid toner-! Mainly cleaning the toner tray out so that you didn't get clumps and spots on the prints.