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Trying to make a barrel cam

[ Edited ]

First attempt: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IsjKUaVeabc

Second attempt: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj9rSZ7Husw

 

Hi all,

 

I am trying to use a cross section, a wrapped sketch, a projected curve, and a swept cut to make a feature that accurately represents how a 4 axis mill would cut this part.

 

I have tried using the normal cut routine. Very easy, but doesn't provide parallel faces (and why should it?)

 

I followed the instructions here: http://community.plm.automation.siemens.com/t5/Solid-Edge-Question-and-Answer/Rail-cut-out-problem/q...

 

They provided me with a fantastic base with which to tackle this problem. But there is an issue. It seems that if the cross section "folds back" onto itself in any part of the sweep, Solid Edge isn't willing to solve. Is there an override or workaround for this?

 

It's also worth noting that if I try to do this operation piece by piece, I get an error when I begin the second cut. Not only that, but it takes nearly forever to go through the process!

 

 

---------------UPDATE-------------------

 I also tried using the method outlined here (for SolidWorks), where the user makes a pattern along curve with a cut hole. I'd be thrilled to start from there and see what happens, but SolidEdge wont keep the hole tangent to the cylinder face, and I'm not sure that's even possible. Now THAT does seem like an oversight. Any thoughts on this method?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkh8GR4dvxQ

 

 

 

 

---------------UPDATE-------------------

I found a great tutorial for doing this in SolidWorks, and attempted to recreate it in Solid Edge. I get a similar error, as seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sj9rSZ7Husw

 

Is there no way to override these types of errors? You can use the steering wheel to make two cylinders intersect, why can't you pattern cylinders in a way where they intersect?

7 REPLIES

Here are my 2 cents - ST5/6 : create the hole as a solid...

Here are my 2 cents

- ST5/6 : create the hole as a solid body, try to pattern it along the curve, merge the bodies and substract

 

- ST4 or less : create the hole as a solid body in a separate part, make and assembly, bring into your 2 parts and try to pattern the "hole" along the curve (even possible??? no time to check), bring the bodie inside your main part as part copy and substract

 

Laurenj.

Solution
Solution
Accepted by topic author lukepighetti
‎08-26-2015 04:32 AM

Luke,   In the past I have done something similar by wrap...

Luke,

 

In the past I have done something similar by wrapping a sketch on the OD and the ID and then using a lofted cut between them. You can use the Variable table to tie all the sketches together and make changes pretty easily... 

 

 I think this gave the best "as manufactured" model.  At the time this topic was very heavily comments on and discussed in the coimmunity and in the end this was the best method for me.

 

HTH.

Matt Johnson
Application Engineer
Ally PLM Solutions
matt.johnson@allyplm.com
http://allyplm.com/

Re: Luke,   In the past I have done something similar by wrap...

[ Edited ]

Hi mjohnson,

This sounds promising, but I can't imagine how this might work. If you wrap just the toolpath centerline and then project, there is no width for which to loft. If you wrap the toolpath cut shape and then project the wrapped sketch to the inside, the width of the 'cut' on the inside cylinder is greatly reduced and would give a similar (identical) result to the 'normal cut'. Are you doing some scratch pad math to adjust the dimensions on the sketch to be wrapped on the inside bore? The geometry transformations are escaping me right now

Edit: As I'm trying to do this, I'm realizing that my understanding of the loft command is very little. I'll keep playing with this...

Re: Here are my 2 cents - ST5/6 : create the hole as a solid...

[ Edited ]

Hi laurenj,

Check out this video. Is this what you had in mind? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rij9Wlm4wH4

Re: Luke,   In the past I have done something similar by wrap...

yea, it's a little tricky to get your sketches. You need to calculate them each in their flat state accounting for the diameter they will be wrapped around... then you can loft between the 2 sketches.

or just wrap 1 sketch and use normal cut...
ill attach 2 parts for you to look at... 2 different appraoches

Matt Johnson
Application Engineer
Ally PLM Solutions
matt.johnson@allyplm.com
http://allyplm.com/

normal cut part example attached

normal cut part example attached

Matt Johnson
Application Engineer
Ally PLM Solutions
matt.johnson@allyplm.com
http://allyplm.com/

manual process

manual process

Matt Johnson
Application Engineer
Ally PLM Solutions
matt.johnson@allyplm.com
http://allyplm.com/