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Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

Hello,

 

We make machines that have a large swinging door attached to a cabinet.  The door has a wire harness that extends beyond the door with Amp CPC connectors on the end.  Also, the harness is enclosed in Igus corrugated tubing.  The cabinet has its own harness with AMP CPC connectors.  There is a small chassis subassembly within the cabinet.  The cabinet has receptacles for the door harness and cabinet harness.  The door harness is routed in a coil before being plugged into the chassis to allow for movement when the door is opened and closed.  This creates challenges when trying to represent these in the assembly drawings.  The door is its own assembly and the cabinet is its own assembly.  They are combined in another assembly and both harnesses are connected to the chassis.  In our old CAD system, we just drew a representation of harness etc.  In Solid Edge, I'm creating place holder parts so they will be counted in the BOM.  In an assembly drawing, however, if I draw the harness using draw-in-view, the BOM will always show and asterisk because nothing is tied to it.

 

The short question is how do you deal with flexible connections between assemblies when each subassembly must have its own drawin that shows the harnesses etc. in a non-coiled position?  I'll try to post some images of what we are wanting to do because I know my verbage is not the best way to describe it.

 

Kyle

Kyle Joiner
IPA LLC
ST10 MP1
17 REPLIES

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

@kjoiner

 

1st thought...    IAC  Insert Assy Copy.   Turn off everything except the connecting harness.

 

Then set this to Reference only.

 

???   just a quick thought without seeing your pics yet...

===================================================
Matt Johnson
Solid Edge Certified Professional (ST7 & ST8)
Solid Edge ST9 (SEEC) - Production
NX11 (Tc Integration) Pre-Production Testing
Teamcenter 10.1.7

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

Hi Matt,

 

Sorry I haven't posted any pictures yet.  We are moving into a new facility this week and our internet has been spotty.  I'll try to get something pulled together to illustrate the application.

 

Kyle

Kyle Joiner
IPA LLC
ST10 MP1

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

Here is a picture of the real conduit.Conduit.jpg

Kyle Joiner
IPA LLC
ST10 MP1

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

I'm still a bit confused on teh question.   Are you asking where to place teh harness within the assy so that the BOM is correct..  or...  you have the proper BOM and are just looking to document it neatly in the dft.   I think you said that you are showing the harness in both the door and cabinet?    does it "belong" to either in their BOM...  or simply being shown for REF?

 

This does not sound like a wire harness or tubing "How to" question but more a how to document in 2D???

 

 

===================================================
Matt Johnson
Solid Edge Certified Professional (ST7 & ST8)
Solid Edge ST9 (SEEC) - Production
NX11 (Tc Integration) Pre-Production Testing
Teamcenter 10.1.7

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

Hi Matt,

 

I think it breaks down into a series of questions:

 

1.  Modeling - The tube is connected between the door assembly and the chassis that is part of a cabinet assembly.  The door can swing open 180°.  In the real world, the tube has to move and change shape as the door is closed.  It's probably not wise to try to make a model do that but I'm somewhat curious.  I do have to show that in the assembly drawing, but I'll probably resort to draw-in-view to illustrate that.  

 

2.  BOM - I can add place holders in the assembly model to account for wire harnesses and the tubing.  If I resort to draw in view, there may be some cases where the BOM will have an * next to the item because there is nothting for the ballon to grab that links it to the BOM.  I may be able to resolve that in some manner by grabbing the connectors that are part of the subassembly

 

3.  As far as your question about what is part of what assembly.  In this example, there are 3 assemblies. 

 

A.  There is the chassis subassembly

B.  There is the door subassembly with its tubing and two connectors

C.  There is the cabinet subassembly with a wire assembly and two connectors

 

These 3 (along with a lot of other parts) are combined in a machine assembly.  The chassis is slid into the cabinet and the cabinet connectors are hooked up.  The door is attached to the cabinet with hinges and the connectors are hooked to the chassis.  The biggest issue for me is what to do with the tubing when the door is closed.  With a "basic" model of the tubing, when the door is closed, the tubing will stick out the side of the machine.  I may just resort to hiding it when the door is closed.

 

I'm already having to consider an alternate position assembly since the detail drawings will require views of the machine with the door open and with the door closed.  I'm trying to avoid any unnecessary complications from a CAD standpoint.

 

Kyle

 

 

Kyle Joiner
IPA LLC
ST10 MP1

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

Lots going on here.  I can see how it can begin to feel overwhelming... 

 

As far as the 3D model...   Have you played with fixed length curves yet?

 

 

 

 

===================================================
Matt Johnson
Solid Edge Certified Professional (ST7 & ST8)
Solid Edge ST9 (SEEC) - Production
NX11 (Tc Integration) Pre-Production Testing
Teamcenter 10.1.7

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

Hi Matt,

 

I haven't tried the fixed length curves yet but that would probably work.  For now I may just have to "fudge" things a little as long as I don't back myself into a corner.  I'm actually in the process of converting 4 of our machines from Cadkey to Solid Edge so I'm jumping back and forth between the models.  I've got a contractor helping with the basic modeling but I'm handling the more complex aspects.  In the long run it will be much better.

 

The biggest challenge is setting up the models to represent how we build them in production.  Alternate position assemblies doesn't seem to bad, but I tried using families of assemblies many years ago and it was nightmare so I hope I can avoid them.

 

Kyle

Kyle Joiner
IPA LLC
ST10 MP1

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Esteemed Contributor Gears Esteemed Contributor
Gears Esteemed Contributor

Harnesses and plumbing are eternal problems in design/drafting, pencil or CAD. Especially when they change "unpredictably" as other components change "predictably". IOW it's predictable what the door and cabinet look like when the door is in any position between closed and fully open. The model does it for you. For things with service loops like wires and tubing it comes down to how many different positions do you have to show. Trying to get a dynamic model of a harness is extremely difficult especially when it's in more than one plane. So generally the task is avoided by representing, as best you can, two arrangements - closed and open. Then using alternate positions or configurations.

If you try the fixed length curve I'd be interested in your results.

Bruce Shand
ST10 MP10 - Insight - Win10 - K4200

Re: Working with tubing/wire harnesses that connect a door to a cabinet

Gears Phenom Gears Phenom
Gears Phenom

 Matt and Bruce,

 

It looks like I'm not alone in the perils of wire harnesses and tubing.  Fortunately, our harnesses and tubing designs have years of stability so their lengths are fairly well known.  Having said that though, I'm probably not bold enough to try modeling the tubing in a dynamic manner.  I'll try to illustrate a representation of it in the assembly drawing in a 2D manner (I'll probably steal the geometry from my old Cadkey drawings Smiley Happy )

 

My main goal is to have enough information in the model so that when I balloon the assembly I don't wind up with asterisks all over the BOM.

 

Along the lines of dynamic representation, I also have some linear motion mechanisms that have cable routed to them through Igus Energy Chain.  For now, the chain is simply a rigid assembly.  A few years ago at one of the Solid Edge Universities, I saw Art Patrick demonstrate a dynamic design with Energy Chain.  He made it look pretty elegant.

 

Kyle

Kyle Joiner
IPA LLC
ST10 MP1