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My name is Dana VanAntwerp, and I am a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. I chose to model and render this full upright piano for the final project of my Intro to Computational Tools class. It is modeled in Solid Edge, rendered in Keyshot, and has 1360 parts, 136 of which are unique.

 

frontview2.jpgA view of the front of the piano.

The design isn't based on any one model of piano, as it seemed unwise to take apart someone else's instrument to measure it. Instead, I used a combination of Google images, schematics, and product descriptions from piano parts suppliers to estimate the dimensions of the components as best I could. It's a Frankenpiano, if you will.

 

frontview3.jpg

 

I based the design carved onto the front and sides of the piano off of a 17th-century Moroccan window screen, which I viewed in the Islamic art gallery of the Art Institute of Chicago. The pattern cut into the music stand is also common in Islamic design, and was chosen to match the original pattern.

 

frontview4-min.jpgThe front panels have been removed from the model, revealing the action, strings, and harp inside.

 

actionview5.jpgA close-up view of the piano's action. The harp and strings are also visible at the left side of the screen, the tuning pins at the top middle, and the keys at the bottom.

The inside of the piano was the most complicated part to model, mostly because of the precision required to make all of the smaller parts fit together and operate correctly. A motor runs on the far left key, causing the key to depress and the action (the group of wooden parts visible above the keys) to strike the strings. The action is a subassembly, repeated over each key. Each string is a unique part, as each one must have a different length.

 

actionview6-min.jpgAnother side view of the piano's interior.keyview2-min.jpgA side view of the piano's keys.

keyview3-min.jpgThe front of the piano.

This project was definitely a big undertaking for me, but I've had a lot of fun in the process. (As you might've guessed from the images above, I've also had fun playing around with the finished product in Keyshot.) I really enjoyed learning more about Solid Edge as I worked, and I intend to continue to improve my design as I learn more about the program.

Full Upright Piano

Dreamer

My name is Dana VanAntwerp, and I am a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. I chose to model and render this full upright piano for the final project of my Intro to Computational Tools class. It is modeled in Solid Edge, rendered in Keyshot, and has 1360 parts, 136 of which are unique.

 

frontview2.jpgA view of the front of the piano.

The design isn't based on any one model of piano, as it seemed unwise to take apart someone else's instrument to measure it. Instead, I used a combination of Google images, schematics, and product descriptions from piano parts suppliers to estimate the dimensions of the components as best I could. It's a Frankenpiano, if you will.

 

frontview3.jpg

 

I based the design carved onto the front and sides of the piano off of a 17th-century Moroccan window screen, which I viewed in the Islamic art gallery of the Art Institute of Chicago. The pattern cut into the music stand is also common in Islamic design, and was chosen to match the original pattern.

 

frontview4-min.jpgThe front panels have been removed from the model, revealing the action, strings, and harp inside.

 

actionview5.jpgA close-up view of the piano's action. The harp and strings are also visible at the left side of the screen, the tuning pins at the top middle, and the keys at the bottom.

The inside of the piano was the most complicated part to model, mostly because of the precision required to make all of the smaller parts fit together and operate correctly. A motor runs on the far left key, causing the key to depress and the action (the group of wooden parts visible above the keys) to strike the strings. The action is a subassembly, repeated over each key. Each string is a unique part, as each one must have a different length.

 

actionview6-min.jpgAnother side view of the piano's interior.keyview2-min.jpgA side view of the piano's keys.

keyview3-min.jpgThe front of the piano.

This project was definitely a big undertaking for me, but I've had a lot of fun in the process. (As you might've guessed from the images above, I've also had fun playing around with the finished product in Keyshot.) I really enjoyed learning more about Solid Edge as I worked, and I intend to continue to improve my design as I learn more about the program.